Canadian Politics Redux

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  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 12,840
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Personally I don’t see any of the online “criticisms” of Trudeau being any different from the vitriol spewed at Harper. It’s all just a matter of which side of the fence you sit on. Perhaps the fact there’s a “fence” at all is half the problem, we’re all too entrenched in our own views.

    While I’ve (obviously?) never been a fan of our current PM, I’m still hoping he’ll do something to win me over, but he keeps digging himself deeper holes.

    Is it perhaps telling that there’s been zero mention in this thread (what better place, after all?) about Dawson’s ethics findings against Trudeau? And saying Harper was as bad or worse is nonsense, I’m sorry. It was Trudeau’s Liberals that campaigned on being so different from the previous government, yet seemingly can’t/won’t walk the walk after talking the talk.
    I know what you're getting at, but I actually do notice a difference. With Harper, people were pissed off and hated them, but they tended to hate him for real shit. But now I'm seeing that the great majority of the hate is based on silly bullshit. Like, I don't know how many time I read about how Trudeau was a drama teacher and how that makes him unqualified. Well, this is just garbage. For one, he taught more than drama. Also, talk about undervaluing teaching, holy. But most importantly, it completely dismisses the fact that Trudeau was already an elected politician for a fair bit of time before he even ran for leadership, and the fact that he was actually every bit as qualified as Harper was when he was first elected. Yet I never once saw the people who hated his guts go off about how unqualified he was, because he wasn't, just like Trudeau isn't. And then as HFD said, much of the vitriol is just bullcrap based in racism and not distinguishing between reality and fact. The Kadr thing is a great example. Trudeau has always been very clear about why the settlement was made. It is logical and based on the Charter of Rights, not his personal opinions. Yet people keep blabbing about how he embraces terrorists, which is really pretty ridiculous. So yeah, I think things are indeed different now, and I definitely think that difference has a lot to do with the whole populist surge that's happening in many countries right now, and not so much on people simply picking sides like they always do, which is on its own certainly true as well... In short... everyone is just acting a lot crazier than they did before Trump came along, and before Brexit, etc.
    Yeah, yeah........ but on to the important news of the day!

    Any opinion on the Canadian men's Olympic hockey team? ;)
    It's actually better than I thought it would be.
    Would you trade in all those gold medals for a 94 canucks Stanley cup win?
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,342
    mcgruff10 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Personally I don’t see any of the online “criticisms” of Trudeau being any different from the vitriol spewed at Harper. It’s all just a matter of which side of the fence you sit on. Perhaps the fact there’s a “fence” at all is half the problem, we’re all too entrenched in our own views.

    While I’ve (obviously?) never been a fan of our current PM, I’m still hoping he’ll do something to win me over, but he keeps digging himself deeper holes.

    Is it perhaps telling that there’s been zero mention in this thread (what better place, after all?) about Dawson’s ethics findings against Trudeau? And saying Harper was as bad or worse is nonsense, I’m sorry. It was Trudeau’s Liberals that campaigned on being so different from the previous government, yet seemingly can’t/won’t walk the walk after talking the talk.
    I know what you're getting at, but I actually do notice a difference. With Harper, people were pissed off and hated them, but they tended to hate him for real shit. But now I'm seeing that the great majority of the hate is based on silly bullshit. Like, I don't know how many time I read about how Trudeau was a drama teacher and how that makes him unqualified. Well, this is just garbage. For one, he taught more than drama. Also, talk about undervaluing teaching, holy. But most importantly, it completely dismisses the fact that Trudeau was already an elected politician for a fair bit of time before he even ran for leadership, and the fact that he was actually every bit as qualified as Harper was when he was first elected. Yet I never once saw the people who hated his guts go off about how unqualified he was, because he wasn't, just like Trudeau isn't. And then as HFD said, much of the vitriol is just bullcrap based in racism and not distinguishing between reality and fact. The Kadr thing is a great example. Trudeau has always been very clear about why the settlement was made. It is logical and based on the Charter of Rights, not his personal opinions. Yet people keep blabbing about how he embraces terrorists, which is really pretty ridiculous. So yeah, I think things are indeed different now, and I definitely think that difference has a lot to do with the whole populist surge that's happening in many countries right now, and not so much on people simply picking sides like they always do, which is on its own certainly true as well... In short... everyone is just acting a lot crazier than they did before Trump came along, and before Brexit, etc.
    Yeah, yeah........ but on to the important news of the day!

    Any opinion on the Canadian men's Olympic hockey team? ;)
    It's actually better than I thought it would be.
    Would you trade in all those gold medals for a 94 canucks Stanley cup win?
    In a heartbeat.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 12,840
    It's not often canadian news breaks the headlines down in the states.  yikes. (I believe this was in winnipeg)
    I know this isn't politics per say but my question is: what happens to the cop in canada?  is he instantly fired and imprisoned?  lengthy investigation? suspended with/without pay?  is the cop always right?  
    http://politicalblindspot.info/2018/01/06/cop-beats-mother-pounds-face-table-front-8-yr-old-child/

    An 8-yr-old son was terrified after watching a cop bludgeon his mother with a baton and then ram her face into a table, according to a report by the Raw Story.

    It began when Lana Sinclair was sitting at home with her child at night. Someone in the neighborhood apparently called the police because they heard “yelling” from outside.Police knocked on Lana’s front door and told her that they were there to investigate her home because they had received reports of “yelling”.
    One of the officers began speaking with Lana and the other officer went off alone with her child.

    Lana had a seat in her kitchen chair as the officer insisted on investigating.

    Lana didn’t know why she needed to be investigated, and that’s when the officer poked her with his finger.

    The poke caused Lana to instinctively stand up out of her chair and tell the officer to not touch her.

    “He came up to me and poked me”, said Lana.

    “I was sitting on a chair in the kitchen and I jumped up and said you don’t need to touch me”, she added.
    In response, the officer pulled out his baton and began striking her with it.

    Her little boy watched as the cop beat her, frightened.
    As if that wasn’t enough, the cop then placed his arm around Lana and pounded her face down into her sewing table.

    “He had my arm behind me and he smashed my face right here”, Lana said as she pointed down at the table.

    The officer then handcuffed her and stood her up, but once she was up, he kicked her feet out from under her, causing her to fall down and drive her head into the floor face-first.

    “We [my son and I] were both traumatized”, Lana said.

    “I just hug him and kiss him and tell him it’s okay”.

    “All I was thinking of was his safety, and how he was going to be traumatized and how he is going to see the police now”.

    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 12,581
    mcgruff10 said:
    It's not often canadian news breaks the headlines down in the states.  yikes. (I believe this was in winnipeg)
    I know this isn't politics per say but my question is: what happens to the cop in canada?  is he instantly fired and imprisoned?  lengthy investigation? suspended with/without pay?  is the cop always right?  
    http://politicalblindspot.info/2018/01/06/cop-beats-mother-pounds-face-table-front-8-yr-old-child/

    An 8-yr-old son was terrified after watching a cop bludgeon his mother with a baton and then ram her face into a table, according to a report by the Raw Story.

    It began when Lana Sinclair was sitting at home with her child at night. Someone in the neighborhood apparently called the police because they heard “yelling” from outside.Police knocked on Lana’s front door and told her that they were there to investigate her home because they had received reports of “yelling”.
    One of the officers began speaking with Lana and the other officer went off alone with her child.

    Lana had a seat in her kitchen chair as the officer insisted on investigating.

    Lana didn’t know why she needed to be investigated, and that’s when the officer poked her with his finger.

    The poke caused Lana to instinctively stand up out of her chair and tell the officer to not touch her.

    “He came up to me and poked me”, said Lana.

    “I was sitting on a chair in the kitchen and I jumped up and said you don’t need to touch me”, she added.
    In response, the officer pulled out his baton and began striking her with it.

    Her little boy watched as the cop beat her, frightened.
    As if that wasn’t enough, the cop then placed his arm around Lana and pounded her face down into her sewing table.

    “He had my arm behind me and he smashed my face right here”, Lana said as she pointed down at the table.

    The officer then handcuffed her and stood her up, but once she was up, he kicked her feet out from under her, causing her to fall down and drive her head into the floor face-first.

    “We [my son and I] were both traumatized”, Lana said.

    “I just hug him and kiss him and tell him it’s okay”.

    “All I was thinking of was his safety, and how he was going to be traumatized and how he is going to see the police now”.

    he will most likely be suspended with pay pending investigation. 
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,342
    Yeah, I think it's about the same as it is in the USA. Innocent until proven guilty, so as HFD said, they're usually suspended with pay until there is a full internal investigation and/or trial/court ruling, since anything else would cause them legal problems.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,342
    Good news.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/charter-solitary-confinement-bc-ruling-1.4491526?cid=

    Indefinite solitary confinement in Canadian prisons ruled unconstitutional by B.C. court

    B.C. Civil Liberties Association had challenged federal government on 'inhuman' practice

    A B.C. Supreme Court judge has ruled that the practice of indefinite solitary confinement in Canadian prisons is unconstitutional. 

    In a lengthy ruling released Wednesday, Justice Peter Leask found that the laws surrounding segregation in prison discriminate against Aboriginal and mentally ill inmates.

    He also found that the existing rules create a situation in which a warden becomes judge and jury in terms of deciding whether prolonged or even indefinite segregation is needed.

    "I find as a fact that administrative segregation … is a form of solitary confinement that places all Canadian inmates subject to it at significant risk of serious psychological harm, including mental pain and suffering, and increased incidence of self-harm and suicide," Leask wrote.

    The B.C. Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) and the John Howard Society of Canada (JHSC) brought the challenge against the federal government, arguing that rules regarding administrative segregation, more commonly known as solitary confinement, are inhuman and unconstitutional.

    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 6,549
    A small program but a really important one, and good news for everybody involved.

    http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/ex-foster-kids-in-b-c-flock-to-college-after-tuition-fees-waived-1.23149023

    The number of ex-foster kids getting a free education at B.C. colleges and universities jumped 20 per cent after the NDP government waived tuition fees last fall, statistics show.

    A total of 229 ex-foster kids received tuition waivers from September to December compared with 189 for the entire 2016-17 school year, the government said.

     The province has spent $443,000 on the program to date to cover tuition and mandatory fees at 17 post-secondary schools.

    Advanced Education Minister Melanie Mark said she’s “thrilled” to see so many students taking advantage of the new program.

    “When we created the policy, they said: ‘What’s going to be the measure of success? What’s success going to look like?’ And I said: ‘One. If one more student goes to post-secondary, that’s a victory.’

    “So we’ve got an increase of 20 per cent.”

    Mark said the government is looking at ways to boost “wrap-around” supports for the students, who are enrolled in a range of programs from nursing and pre-medical studies to trades, business and graphics design.

    “We’ll certainly be enhancing where needed, but we’re still listening,” she said. “It’s still a new policy and it’s too premature, I believe, to make any rash changes.”

    Premier John Horgan announced in September that his government was waiving tuition fees for former youth in care at all 26 post-secondary schools in the province.

    The move expanded on programs already in place at 11 colleges and universities.

    The government said the enrolment increases were mainly at schools, such as Camosun College, that previously lacked a comprehensive tuition waiver program. Camosun now has 31 former youth in care taking courses.

    Joan Yates, Camosun’s vice-president of student experience, said the college was pleasantly surprised by the increase.

    “We’re huge believers that education is an incredibly important tool for people in terms of rebuilding or building their lives and futures,” she said. “This just fits absolutely beautifully with our mandate, so we’re pretty happy about it.”

    Vancouver Island University, which was the first school to offer tuition waivers in 2013, continues to lead other institutions with 85 students attending for free this year, up from 65 last year.

    The school itself covers the costs for about 35 per cent of those students, because they failed to meet the province’s requirement that applicants be under 27 years of age and have spent at least 24 months in care.

    “We don’t have an age cap on it and we say that to qualify [students] need to be in care for a minimum of 12 months,” said William Litchfield, associate vice-president of university relations.

    He added that VIU supports the students by investing in counselling and financial aid programs, and raises additional money across the country to help them with child care, housing, transportation and books.

    Litchfield said VIU believes its role is to make sure all the kids in its community have an opportunity to attend a post-secondary school and find a good job.

    “This is one of our favourite programs,” he said. “These are students that have gone on to win academic achievements and they’re doing absolutely fantastic, but for the most part they weren’t being given the chance they need to shine.”

    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 6,549
    PJ_Soul said:
    Good news.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/charter-solitary-confinement-bc-ruling-1.4491526?cid=

    Indefinite solitary confinement in Canadian prisons ruled unconstitutional by B.C. court

    B.C. Civil Liberties Association had challenged federal government on 'inhuman' practice

    A B.C. Supreme Court judge has ruled that the practice of indefinite solitary confinement in Canadian prisons is unconstitutional. 

    In a lengthy ruling released Wednesday, Justice Peter Leask found that the laws surrounding segregation in prison discriminate against Aboriginal and mentally ill inmates.

    He also found that the existing rules create a situation in which a warden becomes judge and jury in terms of deciding whether prolonged or even indefinite segregation is needed.

    "I find as a fact that administrative segregation … is a form of solitary confinement that places all Canadian inmates subject to it at significant risk of serious psychological harm, including mental pain and suffering, and increased incidence of self-harm and suicide," Leask wrote.

    The B.C. Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) and the John Howard Society of Canada (JHSC) brought the challenge against the federal government, arguing that rules regarding administrative segregation, more commonly known as solitary confinement, are inhuman and unconstitutional.


    Yes, an important decision, and I'm looking forward to the response from the AG. I wonder if the ruling defined "indefinite"? I wouldn't want them to simply replace "indefinite" with "a really long time". It is a challenging area, because the behaviours that some inmates present are really difficult to deal with and the Corrections staff don't necessarily have the training, mindset or interest in dealing with them. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,342
    A small program but a really important one, and good news for everybody involved.

    http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/ex-foster-kids-in-b-c-flock-to-college-after-tuition-fees-waived-1.23149023

    The number of ex-foster kids getting a free education at B.C. colleges and universities jumped 20 per cent after the NDP government waived tuition fees last fall, statistics show.

    A total of 229 ex-foster kids received tuition waivers from September to December compared with 189 for the entire 2016-17 school year, the government said.

     The province has spent $443,000 on the program to date to cover tuition and mandatory fees at 17 post-secondary schools.

    Advanced Education Minister Melanie Mark said she’s “thrilled” to see so many students taking advantage of the new program.

    “When we created the policy, they said: ‘What’s going to be the measure of success? What’s success going to look like?’ And I said: ‘One. If one more student goes to post-secondary, that’s a victory.’

    “So we’ve got an increase of 20 per cent.”

    Mark said the government is looking at ways to boost “wrap-around” supports for the students, who are enrolled in a range of programs from nursing and pre-medical studies to trades, business and graphics design.

    “We’ll certainly be enhancing where needed, but we’re still listening,” she said. “It’s still a new policy and it’s too premature, I believe, to make any rash changes.”

    Premier John Horgan announced in September that his government was waiving tuition fees for former youth in care at all 26 post-secondary schools in the province.

    The move expanded on programs already in place at 11 colleges and universities.

    The government said the enrolment increases were mainly at schools, such as Camosun College, that previously lacked a comprehensive tuition waiver program. Camosun now has 31 former youth in care taking courses.

    Joan Yates, Camosun’s vice-president of student experience, said the college was pleasantly surprised by the increase.

    “We’re huge believers that education is an incredibly important tool for people in terms of rebuilding or building their lives and futures,” she said. “This just fits absolutely beautifully with our mandate, so we’re pretty happy about it.”

    Vancouver Island University, which was the first school to offer tuition waivers in 2013, continues to lead other institutions with 85 students attending for free this year, up from 65 last year.

    The school itself covers the costs for about 35 per cent of those students, because they failed to meet the province’s requirement that applicants be under 27 years of age and have spent at least 24 months in care.

    “We don’t have an age cap on it and we say that to qualify [students] need to be in care for a minimum of 12 months,” said William Litchfield, associate vice-president of university relations.

    He added that VIU supports the students by investing in counselling and financial aid programs, and raises additional money across the country to help them with child care, housing, transportation and books.

    Litchfield said VIU believes its role is to make sure all the kids in its community have an opportunity to attend a post-secondary school and find a good job.

    “This is one of our favourite programs,” he said. “These are students that have gone on to win academic achievements and they’re doing absolutely fantastic, but for the most part they weren’t being given the chance they need to shine.”

    That's awesome!
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
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