Oregonians Freaking Out About Having To Pump Their Own Gas

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Comments

  • The guy in this video is from a nearby town (Salmon Arm). His son was dragged 8 km underneath a car when he tried to stop some loser from fleeing with stolen gas. A law was enacted in his son's name after the incident.

    https://bc.ctvnews.ca/mobile/gas-and-dash-killer-jailed-1-day-for-copycat-crime-victim-s-dad-1.2532642

    * If you watch the video... you'll see him seethe over the Canadian justice system which recently jailed his son's killer one day... yes... one day... for multiple breaches of parole (one offence included stealing a car).

    Here is a link to the law that was enacted as a result of that incident:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/b-c-to-implement-grant-s-law-to-protect-gas-station-workers-1.616126
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,343
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    Always thought that law was stupid. Have family in Oregon and I feel like such a waste of time. If you go at off hours there might only be 1 person working the store who has to run in to work the cash register, back out to pump, help other customers. I've waited over 10 minutes to just get the pump started before.
    You go at busy times they might have more employees, but then there's a line of people waiting. I've almost never found it convenient. 
    And for those who lived in OR their whole life and don't know how to do it, I would imagine every gas station will have a full service option for years to come. I remember most gas stations in California had a full service lane until the mid 90's they faded out when no one used them.
    I do prefer stations that have both self-serve and full-serve. Having a choice is always nice..... That said, y'all should gtfo of your cars when at all possible and this wouldn't be an issue. ;)
    Hey now, you city folk that think you're slick walking to work ain't got it all figured out, everything in your life has to be shipped to you because major metropoli like Vancouver produce very little food and material goods. 
    Your carbon footprint might not be as small as you think it is :wink:
    As opposed to small towns where.... where basically nothing is made locally AND everyone drives a car? ;)
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,847
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    Always thought that law was stupid. Have family in Oregon and I feel like such a waste of time. If you go at off hours there might only be 1 person working the store who has to run in to work the cash register, back out to pump, help other customers. I've waited over 10 minutes to just get the pump started before.
    You go at busy times they might have more employees, but then there's a line of people waiting. I've almost never found it convenient. 
    And for those who lived in OR their whole life and don't know how to do it, I would imagine every gas station will have a full service option for years to come. I remember most gas stations in California had a full service lane until the mid 90's they faded out when no one used them.
    I do prefer stations that have both self-serve and full-serve. Having a choice is always nice..... That said, y'all should gtfo of your cars when at all possible and this wouldn't be an issue. ;)
    Hey now, you city folk that think you're slick walking to work ain't got it all figured out, everything in your life has to be shipped to you because major metropoli like Vancouver produce very little food and material goods. 
    Your carbon footprint might not be as small as you think it is :wink:
    As opposed to small towns where.... where basically nothing is made locally AND everyone drives a car? ;)
    You'd be surprised!  Local and small manufacturing has been decimated in the last few decades, but the systems are still hanging on. 
    Those systems haven't existed in major cities in generations and it's only getting worse. 

    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 10,526
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    Always thought that law was stupid. Have family in Oregon and I feel like such a waste of time. If you go at off hours there might only be 1 person working the store who has to run in to work the cash register, back out to pump, help other customers. I've waited over 10 minutes to just get the pump started before.
    You go at busy times they might have more employees, but then there's a line of people waiting. I've almost never found it convenient. 
    And for those who lived in OR their whole life and don't know how to do it, I would imagine every gas station will have a full service option for years to come. I remember most gas stations in California had a full service lane until the mid 90's they faded out when no one used them.
    I do prefer stations that have both self-serve and full-serve. Having a choice is always nice..... That said, y'all should gtfo of your cars when at all possible and this wouldn't be an issue. ;)
    Hey now, you city folk that think you're slick walking to work ain't got it all figured out, everything in your life has to be shipped to you because major metropoli like Vancouver produce very little food and material goods. 
    Your carbon footprint might not be as small as you think it is :wink:
    As opposed to small towns where.... where basically nothing is made locally AND everyone drives a car? ;)
    You'd be surprised!  Local and small manufacturing has been decimated in the last few decades, but the systems are still hanging on. 
    Those systems haven't existed in major cities in generations and it's only getting worse. 

    Corporations...
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,343
    edited January 9
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    Always thought that law was stupid. Have family in Oregon and I feel like such a waste of time. If you go at off hours there might only be 1 person working the store who has to run in to work the cash register, back out to pump, help other customers. I've waited over 10 minutes to just get the pump started before.
    You go at busy times they might have more employees, but then there's a line of people waiting. I've almost never found it convenient. 
    And for those who lived in OR their whole life and don't know how to do it, I would imagine every gas station will have a full service option for years to come. I remember most gas stations in California had a full service lane until the mid 90's they faded out when no one used them.
    I do prefer stations that have both self-serve and full-serve. Having a choice is always nice..... That said, y'all should gtfo of your cars when at all possible and this wouldn't be an issue. ;)
    Hey now, you city folk that think you're slick walking to work ain't got it all figured out, everything in your life has to be shipped to you because major metropoli like Vancouver produce very little food and material goods. 
    Your carbon footprint might not be as small as you think it is :wink:
    As opposed to small towns where.... where basically nothing is made locally AND everyone drives a car? ;)
    You'd be surprised!  Local and small manufacturing has been decimated in the last few decades, but the systems are still hanging on. 
    Those systems haven't existed in major cities in generations and it's only getting worse. 

    I just don't agree with this assessment. There is still a tone of local business and manufacturing in and around cities. Farming too. There is a hell of a lot more manufacturing and small business in cities than there is in small towns. Most small towns rely on only one or two industries, while cities have the diversity. Not that I don't think outside sources and corporations aren't huge ... I'm just not buying this particular comparison. I think the issue covers towns as much as or more than it does large cities.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,847
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    Always thought that law was stupid. Have family in Oregon and I feel like such a waste of time. If you go at off hours there might only be 1 person working the store who has to run in to work the cash register, back out to pump, help other customers. I've waited over 10 minutes to just get the pump started before.
    You go at busy times they might have more employees, but then there's a line of people waiting. I've almost never found it convenient. 
    And for those who lived in OR their whole life and don't know how to do it, I would imagine every gas station will have a full service option for years to come. I remember most gas stations in California had a full service lane until the mid 90's they faded out when no one used them.
    I do prefer stations that have both self-serve and full-serve. Having a choice is always nice..... That said, y'all should gtfo of your cars when at all possible and this wouldn't be an issue. ;)
    Hey now, you city folk that think you're slick walking to work ain't got it all figured out, everything in your life has to be shipped to you because major metropoli like Vancouver produce very little food and material goods. 
    Your carbon footprint might not be as small as you think it is :wink:
    As opposed to small towns where.... where basically nothing is made locally AND everyone drives a car? ;)
    You'd be surprised!  Local and small manufacturing has been decimated in the last few decades, but the systems are still hanging on. 
    Those systems haven't existed in major cities in generations and it's only getting worse. 

    I just don't agree with this assessment. There is still a tone of local business and manufacturing in and around cities. Farming too. There is a hell of a lot more manufacturing and small business in cities than there is in small towns. Most small towns rely on only one or two industries, while cities have the diversity. Not that I don't think outside sources and corporations aren't huge ... I'm just not buying this particular comparison. I think the issue covers towns as much as or more than it does large cities.
    I'm not getting the impression that you have lived in a small town and understand the dynamics.  It seems like you have a typical city person view of what small towns are like, but I could be wrong and I don't mean offense.
    My home range spans 5 counties full of small towns between the size of a few hundred to just under a hundred thousand and that's pretty typical.  Any one given town may rely on a single industry, or even factory, for economic sustenance, but there's a lot happening when you take it as a whole, and that's not counting farming.  
    It comes down to culture and I don't think we can change our consumer culture without getting much closer to the fundamentals of living in a natural world.  Only the best humans are going to seek out the values which can sustain our species on this planet when they are raised in urban environments full of stimulation and constant gratification.  You are one of those humans that can countenance the issues and find the middle way, but I don't think you should be confident that there are many like you, who will do things like seek out local provisions, reject capitalistic excess, consider their carbon footprint, and so on.
    Most people just exist in a state closer to Homer Simpson, so we need to drag them along and serious culture change is the way.
    We need liberals to leave cities and bring their values out into the rural areas where they can be put to better use!
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,343
    I did live in a small town for a time, yes, and I have friends and family who live in small towns, and I have visited many, many small towns too (I'm pretty sure I don't have a very typical view when it comes to most things, haha) .... I think small towns and large metropolitan areas both rely on imports a lot, but both also have their own local shit going on, and I do think that cities have more shit going on locally than small towns do just by virtue of there being that many people from so many different places and backgrounds in them. There is so much going on within pockets of communities all across cities, and these things are not widely known because they are on such a small scale. But numerous. Just thinking about all the community gardens that have popped up, all the urban farmers markets, the local craft fairs all over the place, the flea markets, the local production companies, all the craft breweries, family businesses, etc etc... so yeah, there is a lot going on with tiny industry and whatnot in big cities - you just can't see it from a distance. Small business are struggling more and more though, just because rents are skyrocketing and they often can't afford the increases, which is horrible.
    The problem with small towns is, of course, that big business is destroying them, and that really sucks. I like me a good small town, lol. They definitely have some amount of appeal... not enough for me to live in one again I don't think, mainly because I never want to have to own a vehicle if I can help it. But still, I get why some people prefer them... I just don't think that them being more self-reliant in terms of materials goods go is a quality modern small towns tend to have.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 11,056
    PJ_Soul said:
    I did live in a small town for a time, yes, and I have friends and family who live in small towns, and I have visited many, many small towns too (I'm pretty sure I don't have a very typical view when it comes to most things, haha) .... I think small towns and large metropolitan areas both rely on imports a lot, but both also have their own local shit going on, and I do think that cities have more shit going on locally than small towns do just by virtue of there being that many people from so many different places and backgrounds in them. There is so much going on within pockets of communities all across cities, and these things are not widely known because they are on such a small scale. But numerous. Just thinking about all the community gardens that have popped up, all the urban farmers markets, the local craft fairs all over the place, the flea markets, the local production companies, all the craft breweries, family businesses, etc etc... so yeah, there is a lot going on with tiny industry and whatnot in big cities - you just can't see it from a distance. Small business are struggling more and more though, just because rents are skyrocketing and they often can't afford the increases, which is horrible.
    The problem with small towns is, of course, that big business is destroying them, and that really sucks. I like me a good small town, lol. They definitely have some amount of appeal... not enough for me to live in one again I don't think, mainly because I never want to have to own a vehicle if I can help it. But still, I get why some people prefer them... I just don't think that them being more self-reliant in terms of materials goods go is a quality modern small towns tend to have.
    I grew up in a town of 1200 people and now I think they are under 1000 who live there.  I visit there a few times a year and I agree with Gambsby on this one if we relate it to food.  In my experience people living in very small towns like the one I grew up remain vastly more self reliant than folks who live in larger places.  They still have a pantry, they have gardens, it is not uncommon for my mother to arrive home to find some sort of produce or local good sitting on her doorstep.  When my father was alive he always had a freezer full of game provided my whomever of the neighbors was successful in their hunt(s).
    As far as clothing and things like that?  The only way I can say that they are different from city people in my experience is that they re-use things and in general do not give two shits about impressing people so they have far fewer...things.

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  • SmellymanSmellyman AsiaPosts: 2,932
    yet obesity is higher in small towns
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 38,343
    edited January 10
    My dad has a huge vegetable garden in his back yard and so do a lot of home owners I know, and they share it with their friends and family. I also know that the used goods industry is alive and well in cities. I dunno, I don't think city dwellers are all so dependent as you guys are making it out to be. Not to say that plenty are dependent on material goods. I just feel like all the people who aren't are being completely overlooked.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
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