The Tragically Hip!!!!

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  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    got a very good copy of the Winnipeg show in FLAC.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • RobbyD462RobbyD462 Victoria BCPosts: 4,513

    got a very good copy of the Winnipeg show in FLAC.

    Sweet can I nab a copy?
    -Seattle,Wash-Key Arena-09/21/09 -Vancouver,B.C-Rogers Arena-12/04/13
    -Seattle,Wash-Key Arena-09/22/09 -Pemberton,B.C-July/2016
    -Vancouver,B.C-GM Place -09/25/09
    -Vancouver,B.C-Pacific Coliseum-09/25/11
    -Missoula,MT-Adams Arena-09/30/12
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    RobbyD462 said:

    got a very good copy of the Winnipeg show in FLAC.

    Sweet can I nab a copy?
    yep. how can I send it to you? it's 790 MB.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    I keep forgetting about their "Live at the Bathhouse" sessions they did and broadcast it into movie theatres across the country. I still haven't seen it. I shall youtube it later.

    http://tragicallyhiptour.blogspot.ca/2009/04/tragically-hip-live-at-bathouse-review.html

    Tragically Hip: Live at the Bathouse - Review
    Pin It Now!

    by mrjackstraw


    We battled the harsh April weather on a cold blustery Monday night to go and see The Tragically Hip's live HD presentation from their famed Bathouse studio in Bath, Ontario. Somehow it seemed appropriate. Fans from across the nation were invited into The Hip's digs for the first time to see where and how it all goes down. George Stroumboulopoulos facilitated the interaction between the band and us fans who were nestled into theatres across Canada and, speaking for myself, happily buzzed and excited at the possibilities.

    The band opened the show standing facing each other in a small front room with The Depression Suite: The Rock, NewOrleansWorld, Don't You Want to See How it Ends?
    a track that measures 9+ minutes on the new album made up of the above listed three sections. Keyboardist Jim Bryson joined the band as he will on their upcoming tour. After a welcome from George and the band we were treated to the beautiful opening track Morning Moon.

    The cameras began to move through the house and George had a few words with the on site sound engineer as the band members came one by one into this room. Gord went on to relate to those of us in the Movie-aters just what the house meant to him and the band and how they had over time build this nest in which to create.

    The opening strums from Thompson Girl could be heard in the background and Gord led the cameras into the Kitchen where they had originally worked out the arrangement for the song. The instruments were stripped, especially the drum kit allowing for a more back-to-the-basics approach to working through songs. As if to demonstrate this The Hip played an acoustic version of Music@Work that I hope they keep. Or at least never let us know what version we might get.

    Strombo interviewed the rhythm section of Johnny Fay and Gord Sinclair and they went into how they learned together and what an honor it was to be playing together all these years. Gord also talked about the importance of making each show a stand alone event and how diverse setlists were needed. Thank you Gord Sinclair! I could not agree more and am currently even more excited for the upcoming tour. There was also a huge chalk board on the wall with a list of chores, hotels where people were staying and Jimmy O's phone number. I wonder if anyone called him? Anyways, I think every kitchen should have one of these. Household organization baby!

    George Stroumboulopoulos led the camera up the stairs and past a lot of original art pieces from various Tragically Hip albums. There was a huge wall hanging of the Fully Completely cover and the charcoal drawing from Day for Night were in the upstairs hallway. I remember thinking of the old house across from the Ford's Theater in Washington, DC where they brought Abraham Lincoln to die in peace after he was shot. I was there less than a month ago and it was preserved just as it was for all of us today to see. Will the Bathouse ever be a tourist attraction? Preserved as it is today to become one of those wacky Canadian culture landmarks? Aah weed.

    Along with bedrooms upstairs for whoever needs to crash, there is also a cozy pool/snooker room. George was in there with Robby, Paul and Gord aka The Three Strings. They shot the shit about band life, working together for all these years and the difficulties of a being in a long term relationship. It was during this point that the first random audience request came in. With just two acoustic guitars and Gord in the room I was thinking the randomness had to be limited to a song like...Bobcaygeon. And so it was. What made this version unique was that Gord sand it while shooting snooker with Strombo. He sat. He stood. He shot. He made a combo shot! All while singing. The game wasn't even close. Strombo got killed. The guitarists had to duck out of the way as they played to accommodate the shooters. Good stuff.

    Next we were introduced to a guy who wrote the band as a fan and asked for a job. I should have done that. He's seen everything they've done since 1992 and wears many hats. Fans rarely get to see the so-called support staff of their favorite bands. You gotta feel that along the way these people have influenced little things here and there having an impact on the evolution process. Rock and Roll: You know what I'm saying! I didn't get his name so feel free to let me know.

    Above the garage is a new area to the Bathouse that the band refers to as The Loft with lots of space for the band to throw down. The band plays Coffee Girl followed by The Last Recluse and both sounded great and should have nice careers inside the Hip's cannon. Back we go to audience requests and the call come in for Escape Is At Hand For The Traveling Man. Giddy up! Feel free to play this one whenever I'm in attendance. That's 3 from Phantom Power if you're keeping score at home. Love Is A First comes next and from my point of view is poised to become a live monster.

    Another random fan request is honored in the way of Courage. Strombo mentions that this is his and the crew's request as well causing me to raise an eyebrow as to the randomness of these random requests. Whatever. It's out of my hands. If it was in my hands they would have played The Luxury. Ho ho. Gordie mentions a store in Kensington Market here in Toronto called "Courage My Love" but says he couldn't say that so he changed it to "Courage, my word".

    My favorite song came next. Track 5 on We Are the Same: Now the Struggle Has a Name. This one's a keeper in my books. Beautiful, beautiful song. At the end of the song Gord looks out the window and the camera pans back to the outdoor fire pit depicted on the album cover. We are done. As the credits roll the band goes into another song. I'm not sure which one.

    Thanks to the band for giving us, the fans, a little glimpse of your world. It's like we finally made it into the secret clubhouse. The 2009 tour should be fantastic. There is some great new material here that the boys will be working with and the addition of a touring keyboardist will bring more textures to the music and allow for some new arrangements to some older material keeping it fresh for us and them.

    Live From the Bathouse - Setlist:

    The Depression Suite
    Morning Moon
    Thompson Girl
    Music@Work
    Bobcaygeon
    Coffee Girl
    Last Recluse
    Escape Is At Hand For the Traveling Man
    Love Is A First
    Courage
    Now the Struggle Has a Name
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 37,480
    Considering that I am signed up to the mailing list, I sure don't get much info about the happening with The Hip. They seem to broadcast almost nothing via their fan maillist.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • new hip dvd coming out

    http://www.bellmedia.ca/pr/press/five-musicians-15-dates-90-songs-millions-of-fans-one-unforgettable-summer-the-tragically-hips-historic-tour-immortalized-in-new-documentary-from-bell-media/

    TORONTO (November 1, 2016) – The Tragically Hip’s 2016 epic cross-Canada tour, culminating in a highly charged and powerful concert in their hometown of Kingston, Ont., captured the heart of the country. Bell Media is teaming up with Canada’s foremost chroniclers of popular music, Banger Films, in association with Shed Creative (a division of Universal Music Canada), and one of the country’s most celebrated documentary filmmaking teams, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier, to take viewers on-stage, in the crowd and behind-the-scenes of this historic tour. Commissioned by Bell Media and coming to multiple Bell Media channels and platforms in 2017, MAN MACHINE POEM (working title) is a feature documentary that follows The Tragically Hip’s momentous cross-country tour after the band’s announcement that lead singer Gord Downie has incurable brain cancer.

    The documentary event special will premiere exclusively across an array of Bell Media TV and on-demand platforms, including national pay service The Movie Network, leading specialty channel MUCH, and to a mass audience on Canada’s most-watched network, CTV, before moving exclusively to CraveTV.
    “We are incredibly honoured to share this amazing moment in Canadian history with the band and viewers across the country,” said Randy Lennox, President, Broadcasting and Content, Bell Media. “MAN MACHINE POEM comes from a dream team behind the camera and we know they’ll show Canada a side of The Hip we’ve never seen before.”

    “We have filmed hundreds of hours of footage from the tour and beyond,” said Scot McFadyen, co-founder of Banger Films. “This stands to be a powerful cinematic music doc that captures a nation’s love for a band whose music and lyrics embody the Canadian spirit.”

    From visceral celebration of performances where the whole arena jumped in unison, to singular moments of appreciation, grief, and love, viewers will be given a unique perspective on this ambitious arena tour, which sold out in minutes, as well as the reactions from their devoted fans.

    In stunning 4K, MAN MACHINE POEM will include select performances from the Man Machine Poem tour that took the band from Victoria, B.C. to Kingston, Ont., as they played close to 90 different songs from their albums through the years – a unique selection for each concert.

    Capturing these iconic performances and the profound reactions from fans, the documentary encourages viewers to stop and reflect on the shared experience and collective appreciation for this music that somehow embodies what it means to be Canadian. MAN MACHINE POEM is the definitive document of The Hip’s final tour.

    MAN MACHINE POEM (working title) is directed by Canadian documentary filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier (Manufactured Landscapes, Act of God, Watermark), and produced by Scot McFadyen (RUSH: BEYOND THE LIGHTED STAGE) and Sam Dunn (METAL: A HEADBANGER’S JOURNEY), in association with Shed Creative (a division of Universal Music Canada). Music Consultant is Tyson Parker, Bell Media. Production Executive is Robin Johnston, Bell Media. Corrie Coe is Senior Vice-President, Independent Production, Bell Media. Mike Cosentino is Senior Vice-President, CTV and Specialty, Bell Media. Tracey Pearce is President, Distribution and Pay, Bell Media. Randy Lennox is President, Broadcasting and Content, Bell Media. Elevation Pictures Corp. will distribute the film internationally and is planning a special theatrical release in Canada next year.
  • RobbyD462RobbyD462 Victoria BCPosts: 4,513

    new hip dvd coming out

    http://www.bellmedia.ca/pr/press/five-musicians-15-dates-90-songs-millions-of-fans-one-unforgettable-summer-the-tragically-hips-historic-tour-immortalized-in-new-documentary-from-bell-media/

    TORONTO (November 1, 2016) – The Tragically Hip’s 2016 epic cross-Canada tour, culminating in a highly charged and powerful concert in their hometown of Kingston, Ont., captured the heart of the country. Bell Media is teaming up with Canada’s foremost chroniclers of popular music, Banger Films, in association with Shed Creative (a division of Universal Music Canada), and one of the country’s most celebrated documentary filmmaking teams, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier, to take viewers on-stage, in the crowd and behind-the-scenes of this historic tour. Commissioned by Bell Media and coming to multiple Bell Media channels and platforms in 2017, MAN MACHINE POEM (working title) is a feature documentary that follows The Tragically Hip’s momentous cross-country tour after the band’s announcement that lead singer Gord Downie has incurable brain cancer.

    The documentary event special will premiere exclusively across an array of Bell Media TV and on-demand platforms, including national pay service The Movie Network, leading specialty channel MUCH, and to a mass audience on Canada’s most-watched network, CTV, before moving exclusively to CraveTV.
    “We are incredibly honoured to share this amazing moment in Canadian history with the band and viewers across the country,” said Randy Lennox, President, Broadcasting and Content, Bell Media. “MAN MACHINE POEM comes from a dream team behind the camera and we know they’ll show Canada a side of The Hip we’ve never seen before.”

    “We have filmed hundreds of hours of footage from the tour and beyond,” said Scot McFadyen, co-founder of Banger Films. “This stands to be a powerful cinematic music doc that captures a nation’s love for a band whose music and lyrics embody the Canadian spirit.”

    From visceral celebration of performances where the whole arena jumped in unison, to singular moments of appreciation, grief, and love, viewers will be given a unique perspective on this ambitious arena tour, which sold out in minutes, as well as the reactions from their devoted fans.

    In stunning 4K, MAN MACHINE POEM will include select performances from the Man Machine Poem tour that took the band from Victoria, B.C. to Kingston, Ont., as they played close to 90 different songs from their albums through the years – a unique selection for each concert.

    Capturing these iconic performances and the profound reactions from fans, the documentary encourages viewers to stop and reflect on the shared experience and collective appreciation for this music that somehow embodies what it means to be Canadian. MAN MACHINE POEM is the definitive document of The Hip’s final tour.

    MAN MACHINE POEM (working title) is directed by Canadian documentary filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier (Manufactured Landscapes, Act of God, Watermark), and produced by Scot McFadyen (RUSH: BEYOND THE LIGHTED STAGE) and Sam Dunn (METAL: A HEADBANGER’S JOURNEY), in association with Shed Creative (a division of Universal Music Canada). Music Consultant is Tyson Parker, Bell Media. Production Executive is Robin Johnston, Bell Media. Corrie Coe is Senior Vice-President, Independent Production, Bell Media. Mike Cosentino is Senior Vice-President, CTV and Specialty, Bell Media. Tracey Pearce is President, Distribution and Pay, Bell Media. Randy Lennox is President, Broadcasting and Content, Bell Media. Elevation Pictures Corp. will distribute the film internationally and is planning a special theatrical release in Canada next year.

    So cool!!
    -Seattle,Wash-Key Arena-09/21/09 -Vancouver,B.C-Rogers Arena-12/04/13
    -Seattle,Wash-Key Arena-09/22/09 -Pemberton,B.C-July/2016
    -Vancouver,B.C-GM Place -09/25/09
    -Vancouver,B.C-Pacific Coliseum-09/25/11
    -Missoula,MT-Adams Arena-09/30/12
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    Gord hinted at new Hip music in his National interview. Not sure if that was mentioned or not. I wouldn't be surprised if they put out a rarities set. That would be killer.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 37,480
    edited November 2016

    Gord hinted at new Hip music in his National interview. Not sure if that was mentioned or not. I wouldn't be surprised if they put out a rarities set. That would be killer.

    Yeah, didn't he say something like there being a good 3 albums worth of material that hasn't been released? Not sure if he meant the The Hip, his own work, or both though.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    PJ_Soul said:

    Gord hinted at new Hip music in his National interview. Not sure if that was mentioned or not. I wouldn't be surprised if they put out a rarities set. That would be killer.

    Yeah, didn't he say something like there being a good 3 albums worth of material that hasn't been released? Not sure if he meant the The Hip, his own work, or both though.
    I believe it in the context of the Hip, but I can't be sure. I'd have to watch it again. Either way, that's great news.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • jordan kjordan k Posts: 176
    That documentary looks amazing. I usually watch these at the gym while doing cardio, and I feel like there may be some tears that well up.
    Key Arena - Nov 05 2000, General Motors Place - May 30 2003, General Motors Place - Sep 02 2005, Canada Olympic Park - Aug 08 2009,Key Arena - Sep 22 2009, GM Place - Sep 25 2009, The O2 - Jun 22 2010, Odyssey Arena - Jun 23 2010, Hyde Park - Jun 25 2010, Alpine Valley Music Theatre - Sep 03, 2011, Alpine Valley Music Theatre - Sep 04, 2011, Scotiabank Saddledome - Sep 21, 2011, Rexall Place - Sep 23, 2011, Pacific Coliseum - Sep 25, 2011, Portland OR 11-29-2013, Spokane WA 11-30-2013, Vancouver BC 12-04-2013, Seattle WA 12-06-2013, Toronto ON 05-10-2016, Toronto ON 05-12-2016

    EV Arlene Schnitzer Hall - July 14 2011, EV Benaroya Hall - July 16 2011

  • found a nice article with some Q&A for Joel Plaskett(one of my heros)
    http://www.macleans.ca/culture/arts/joel-plaskett-on-the-tragically-hip-lucky-to-be-in-their-presence/
    The Halifax singer/songwriter on the Hip in the Canadian landscape — pure and cool and weird
    Michael Barclay
    August 13, 2016
    Joel Plaskett is a Halifax singer/songwriter who is often hailed as one of the true heirs of The Tragically Hip’s legacy, in terms of writing stadium-size, raw rock’n’roll married with the Canadian folk tradition, with explicit lyrical nods to a specific sense of place. He spent the ’90s with his high school friends in Thrush Hermit; in the 2000s he formed the Joel Plaskett Emergency, who opened for the Tragically Hip in 2004; you can hear Gord Downie thanking them on the 2005 live album That Night in Toronto.

    What did the Tragically Hip mean to you as a kid?
    A. I got Up to Here in Grade 9, when it came out. Then I found the first blue album [the 1987 debut self-titled EP]. I was a big fan of that and Road Apples; those two records got a lot of play from me. Then the whole Halifax thing took off, the Hermit got going, and I was very wrapped up in what was happening locally. When they were touring those early records, I was too young to see them in bars. The first two records—I can sing along to every song. “Little Bones” and the riff-rock stuff like that kicked my ass and continues to do so. There were songs after: “Courage,” that song too stuck with me. He dedicated “Courage” to Hugh McLennan, who is a first cousin of my grandfather. I met Hugh when I was in junior high; I remember him coming over to my grandparents’ house for dinner.

    So you didn’t follow them in the ’90s, when they were ubiquitous?
    A. There were always songs on my radar, but I didn’t have intimacy with the records. That goes with almost every band: [as a fan], you have two records you always go back to. After that I only knew the hits. I did see one show in the ’90s, maybe in the late ’90s, at the Metro Centre. It was when we got the opportunity to tour with them, in 2004, that my real understanding came, when I had an insight into the power of the band, Gord in particular as a frontman and lyricist, and the scope of their music in terms of how deep-reaching it was. It was an opportunity to learn a lot. They embody a sense of community. They never lost their love of cool Canadian rock’n’roll and songwriters. Their opening acts, you could walk the different sides of what they did, from the Rheostatics to Change of Heart to Eric’s Trip to the Constantines to Buck 65 to us. Their love of music is obvious.

    What do you think makes them special?

    A. There’s a singularity to the band. I can hear the Stones and the R.E.M. in it and other things they were tapping, but they’re not copying any one band. Then the brew, and particularly what Gord has chosen to sing over these kind of songs, is a totally distinct recipe. It’s not a juxtaposition. That’s what interesting about the band. You hear a certain groove and you hear a phrase or story laid over it that turns you a bit sideways. It’s an unconventional quality that is unique to them. What more can you ask for than when you drop the needle on something and you can instantly say, “Oh, that’s the Tragically Hip.” You never think, “Oh, it could be something else.” Even though the records are produced differently, there’s something about the recipe the whole band has, not just Gord. I’ve been listening to them a lot over the last few months, as I’m sure many have—you feel an urgency to remind yourself what it is you love about the band. It is that unusual quality the band has at such a successful level is such an inspiration. This represents something cool about Canada that a hugely celebrated band that can be so weird. That gives me a lot of hope, that the art has pushed its way into the mainstream. It’s like Group of Seven paintings: you feel the intention is always there and pure but it’s also widely accepted in a way that makes you feel proud to be part of that landscape.

    When they were at their commercial height, I feel like their ubiquity overshadowed how different they were from what else was going on. I knew a lot of artier people who thought the band were merely rubes with an interesting lyricist. That changed over time. The ’90s were very tribal.
    A.If I were to be totally honest, if you talked to me in ’96, I might say, “I don’t know if I like this band.” (laughs) I’d have something critical to say about it because it was everywhere, and as a young man you’re trying to mark your own territory. It’s not that I actively disliked them. For me, it’s unveiled itself over time; my appreciation has deepened. I start to see what they were doing. I got out of my young indie rock snobby self, and realized that things they were doing that seemed so simple weren’t simple at all. As I’ve grown older, some songs resonate more, either the subject or the poetry and language that click in a way they didn’t for me back then.
  • What songs are you thinking of?
    A. There are the big ones you love regardless, like “Ahead by a Century.” My favourite song that didn’t cross my radar at the time was “Bobcaygeon.” I was not listening to them at the time that song came out. But it didn’t register with me until I was in its presence live. A lot of people’s love for any band comes from seeing them live and watching them develop and feeling like you’re a part of that momentum. That kind of fandom stems from feeling like you were there at an early stage and there’s all this nostalgia built into it.

    What’s your take on Downie’s writing style?
    A. They have a couple of modes. Sometimes you think they’re just jamming and Gord’s just winging it. Other times the lyrics show up very crystallized and—not exactly clear, because there are always angles and tangents there. What’s really great is that there are these phrases that leap out and you grab on to them, despite the fact you don’t know what they mean to him or why they’re there, you develop your own relationship with them. You react even to the punctuation or the meter of the words in a very visceral way.

    You’re one of the few rock writers of the generation after the Tragically Hip who occasionally write explicitly about this country. How do you think they changed the landscape?

    A. It’s not like I’m a super well-read person, but I have my peculiar interests. I have a lot of references in my music that only a few people might pick up on. And I know that when I mention Halifax or Edmonton, beers get cracked. I’m happy to do that, and I wear that badge as a Canadian, and people celebrate this location-based stuff that I evoke in my songs. But I’ve also written songs about Australia and other places I’ve been, or I’ll sing about Robert Mitchum in Night of the Hunter. I’m not reinventing any wheels; a lot of writers do that. But obviously people really pick up on what they relate to the most. Gord does sing about Canadian history and hockey, and it’s great to celebrate that. But Gord’s writing goes all over the place. It’s rich, and you can dig deeper than what most people associate with it.

    In folk, counttry and especially hip-hop, the local is paramount; there is a distinct sense of place in the lyrics in all those genres. Whereas rock music doesn’t often do that. Most rock lyrics are still very generic and universal.

    A. I remember a conversation in the Hermit days. We had this song called “North Dakota” on Sweet Homewrecker, and it was about being denied at the border. It was about being Canadian. But someone said to me, “Why don’t you write about where you’re from? Why do you write about American places?” That kind of stuck with me, that someone was taking this at face value; they thought the song was about North Dakota.

    That’s very funny to me, because one of the Hip’s very first hits was about taking “the last American exit to the northland”—similarly identifying the narrator as Canadian in an indirect way.
    A. Ha, that’s right, isn’t it? The more I travelled, the more I reflected on where I was from. The idea of this sense of regionalism in music for me became a lot more fascinating as I got into New Orleans music or Memphis music or this idea of being associated with a place. The Hip is a Canadian band that punches above its weight around the world, but they’re also distinctly from Ontario. As a guy from Nova Scotia, they somehow romanticize Ontario cottage country, which is an experience I don’t know. When I think of people in Ontario having a good time in the summer by a lake, I think of the Tragically Hip. (laughs) They evoke a sense of place even if you’re not from there. That’s what Springsteen did for Jersey: suddenly you can romanticize something that’s maybe pretty banal and make it cool. In rock music you mostly hear a lot of big universal sentiments, this weird middle ground that is always been less interesting than the peculiar. I always liked Vic Chesnutt, too, for that reason.

    Did you ever talk to the band about songwriting?
    A. They’re all quiet guys, I can’t say I got to know them too well. Talking to Gord—he’s not elusive, but he’s a listener. I’m a talker, and he’d just be silently engaging me. Then he’d say a few things that would be everything I should have said in a condensed form. That’s probably what makes him such a great wordsmith. He gives you just a few bits that you can chew on for a long time. All the contexts in which I’ve encountered him have been at a show or a tour. He came out to one of my shows once, which was such an honour. We were at the Horseshoe and he got up and we did a version of “Love This Town” and he riffs on a verse. You can find it on YouTube. That meant a lot to me.

    Have you heard the new record?
    A. Yes. Oh man, there’s a song on there, “Ocean Next,” that is so good. Tell me, because I don’t know, was that record all done before the news?

    Yes it was. He was diagnosed in December, and it was finished shortly before that.
    A. I think that, um, I don’t really—I mean, man, the whole thing just bums me out, with the exception of the fact that what they’re doing now is so inspiring. I’ve had a few people call me about the Hip in light of what’s going on. I feel lucky to merit that phone call because I’ve been in their proximity and I’m a fan. A lot of people have told me they first saw me opening for the Hip. That means a lot to me and I feel very blessed. Proud is a weird word, but seeing what they’re doing makes me want to stand up a little straighter, the grace with which they’re handling things. I think we’re lucky to be in their presence right now.
  • Joel Plaskett & Gord Downie - Love this Town at the legendary horseshoe tavern in 2007. joel did 6 shows in 6 straight days. covering a diff album every night from starts to finish. then adding a set after that of the hits. major highlight of my life, especially when gord showed up(clip below)
    mon dec 10-in need of medical attention
    tues dec 11-down at the khyber
    wed dec 12-la de da
    thurs dec 13-truthfully truthfully
    fri dec 14-ashtray rock
    sat dec 15-various

  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    with ed's heartfelt tribute to gord at wrigley over the summer, and with gord's new project for aboriginal reconciliation, i wonder if ed or pj would cover a hip song and donate the proceeds to the cause. it's worthwhile, no doubt.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • that would be awesome if that came together. it was so very cool of ed to even mention gord on that special day. ed's such a class act. gotta wonder if they baked in seattle when they met. i'm betting yes...
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953

    that would be awesome if that came together. it was so very cool of ed to even mention gord on that special day. ed's such a class act. gotta wonder if they baked in seattle when they met. i'm betting yes...

    I am also betting yes.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • with ed's heartfelt tribute to gord at wrigley over the summer, and with gord's new project for aboriginal reconciliation, i wonder if ed or pj would cover a hip song and donate the proceeds to the cause. it's worthwhile, no doubt.

    I would love PJ to cover a Hip tune...have often wondered which song it would be if they did. I think a cover of Scared would be great, or maybe a rocking version of Gift Shop. *Sigh* dare to dream.
    Note to self: Don't die
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    I keep listening to many of their unreleased tracks that sound like they got dubbed off a broken ghetto blaster in 1952 underwater. God I hope they release a rarities set.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    RobbyD462 said:

    got a very good copy of the Winnipeg show in FLAC.

    Sweet can I nab a copy?
    shit. forgot about this.
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    edited December 2016
    I have the 4 acoustic tracks they played at Planet Studios back during the Phatom Power cycle. I noticed today they are numbered tracks 2, 4,6, and 7. does anyone have all 7 tracks? are the in between tracks just interview segments? If so, I'd like to hear them. @demetrios ?
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • the full morning moon was a real beuty today
    reminded me of this song
    god bless gord
    Gord Downie Morning Moon July 23/2011 Jackson Triggs Niagara on the Lake
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    would be extra cool if PJ let the Hip use footage of Ed talking about them in the doc. 
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • MayDay10MayDay10 Posts: 9,011
    http://www.thehip.com/gift-shop/store/

    good god, that box set...
  • Red LukinRed Lukin CanadaPosts: 2,669
    edited September 14
    Would love the boxed set but whew $500!
    Post edited by Red Lukin on
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 11,953
    going to see Long Time Running with my wife tomorrow after sushi. looking forward to it. just found out though that it's also going to be on TV commercial free in a month or two. oh well, date night! 
    T minus 9 days and counting..........
  • going to see Long Time Running with my wife tomorrow after sushi. looking forward to it. just found out though that it's also going to be on TV commercial free in a month or two. oh well, date night! 
    Looking forward to seeing it myself but will likely have to wait for a blu-ray release here in the US.  Really wish they would just release the final concert in full!
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 37,480
    going to see Long Time Running with my wife tomorrow after sushi. looking forward to it. just found out though that it's also going to be on TV commercial free in a month or two. oh well, date night! 
    Looking forward to seeing it myself but will likely have to wait for a blu-ray release here in the US.  Really wish they would just release the final concert in full!
    Will it not be on Netflix in the US?
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
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