Abortion-Keep Legal, Yes or No?

2456716

Comments

  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 12,342
    edited March 1
    This iser close to my heart since my mother was debating abortion when she was pregnant with me. And let me tell ya, I am pretty happy about the fact that she decided against it. 
    So from a perspective of a child that nearly didn't make it into the world... I fucking hate abortion and it hurts me to think of all the little people whose mother decided against them... BUT!
    As a woman I also understand that there are situations where it seems impossible to raise or even give birth to a child. You may feel too young, immature, poor, socially isolated or your pregnancy may have been a result of rape which is absolutely horrifying. I even understand why my own mother was considering abortion, I am not mad at her, because in the end she decided to keep me. As difficult as my life may be sometimes, I am still thankful. 
    I think what it needs is a better support system for women who are pregnant and face seemingly hopeless situations. There is so much stigma when it comes to teenage pregnancies, single women and so on as well as financial pressure when raising a child. It's just not fair. We have the future of humanity in our bellies and are being treated like shit sometimes.  I wish we lived a world where no child was seen as a burden but as a gift and where no one would look at you like you were a mass murderer when you have to give a child away because you want it to have a future you are not able to provide. 
    Similar situation. My grandmother tried to convince my mother to abort me, especially since my dad had disappeared. But my mom really wanted a baby, so she kept me. She was 17 years old and worked at Kentucky Fried Chicken when she was pregnant with me, and her lot in life only go worse (alcoholism, domestic abuse, crack addiction). But she did what she could to make sure that I had clothes on my back (mostly thanks to grandma's Sears credit card) and food in my tummy (mostly thanks to food stamps and welfare cheese). 

    The important thing is that our moms wanted us. And more often than not, this is the case. But for those instances when it's not -- well, again, my opinion shouldn't matter, so I won't state it.
    Post edited by dankind on
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 14,820
    Keep it legal.  

    As for how long or when is a cutoff time, I'm not sure if there should be one.
  • PJinILPJinIL satan's bedPosts: 381
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    It's amazing what you hear when you take time to listen.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    edited March 1
    Keep it legal.  

    As for how long or when is a cutoff time, I'm not sure if there should be one.
    I figure there has to be SOME cut off. I mean, not that it really happens, contrary to what idiot Trump says, I think a woman who is 7, 8, 9 months pregnant can't be having an abortion, because that's usually birth. Fetuses that old are just too viable for abortions. If it was actually an abortion, that would mean they'd have to specifically go out of their way to kill the baby even though it could live outside of the mother. I don't like that idea, and I think viability outside the womb is a logical place to draw lines with abortion. I mean, why would any woman need to wait that long to have an elective abortion?? That doesn't even make sense IMO. I don't think it's too much to ask that a woman get an abortion before the baby can survive without her. She had months to make that decision.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 12,342
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Throw in a uterus transplant for gestation, and I'm on board.
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 4,244
    edited March 1
    Keep it legal.  

    As for how long or when is a cutoff time, I'm not sure if there should be one.
    So you would be okay with “aborting”(killing) a fully formed baby given that he/she is still in the mother?  Mind=Blown
    Post edited by PJPOWER on
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Miss.SnowdropMiss.Snowdrop ScotlandPosts: 164
    PJ_Soul said:
    Of course, and I can't even believe it's still up for debate in America, in terms of a simple yes or no. I think it's beyond clear that other people's opinions on whether or not a women should be allowed to have control over her own body are completely irrelevant, at least in the more black and white context.
    The one thing I am actually comfortable supporting is a reasonable hard deadline for elective abortion, barring medical reasons, obviously (including allowing mothers to choose to abort after if there are problems with the fetus, including things like Downs, only up until the earliest time it's possible to find such things out). I.e. elective abortion maybe shouldn't be legal after, say, 16 weeks? IMO, 16 weeks is more than enough time for someone to know they're pregnant and decide what to do if they don't want the baby.... that is, if abortions are accessible. They often aren't in America, and the delay can be directly related to that. In those cases, fuck the system. It makes me feel awful that women still have to fight to control their own bodies in many places in America like that, and are met with barriers every step of the way.
    16 weeks is enough to know, if you are pregnant, if you're healthy and your body works normally. But in many cases women don't have regular periods or may even still have periods even though they are pregnant or they keep at least spotting. And not everyone gets morning sickness or not as bad and may simply think they have a stomach bug.
    At least 1 in 10 women have PCOS which leads to irregular periods and many don't even know they have it...
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,723
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    edited March 1
    As I said, access to abortion issues are the exception IMO.
    And obviously the very RARE occurrences when women don't know they're pregnant 4 months into a pregnancy are acceptable excuses in my mind, but let's not pretend that's anything close to normal.
    Basically, I'm for common sense. Since I'm not a law maker, I don't really feel obligated to abandon my opinion about 16 weeks for the sake of every single little exception under the sun, nor do I feel married to a 16 week deadline. Hey, maybe after 16 weeks a case-by-case kind of thing could happen, and not in "the American way", lol. I'm talking in an unbiased way.
    Actually, I'm really basically fine with anything up to viability outside the womb, which is later than 16 weeks.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 12,266
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Agreed.
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 12,342
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Agreed.
    How long has it been?


    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • wobbler_kittywobbler_kitty Millbury, MAPosts: 155
    edited March 1
    Post edited by wobbler_kitty on
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,544
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 871
    I thought what Romney said in 2012 was a good compromise. The first trimester is ok. And after that it’s illegal. 
    I undertand common ground needs to be met and compromises need to be made to please all people 
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,723
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
    Are you sure about the 20 week premie surviving? I just tried to find this and could only find record of the earliest ever surviving premie at 21 weeks 6 days. Post a link if you can.  

    It it is certainly an issue that’s hotly discussed in terms of medical ethics, though, as the limits to viability creep gradually lower. One thing to remember is that premies  born at these very early ages generally have massive medical problems, so of course the other issue is, should we be resuscitating and treating them at 21, 22, 23 weeks, when the outcome is likely poor, and often catastrophic?

    I doubt we’ll see much additional further gains in early viability unless we do get that “artificial womb”, and then the whole conversation changes.  
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    edited March 1
    riley540 said:
    I thought what Romney said in 2012 was a good compromise. The first trimester is ok. And after that it’s illegal. 
    I undertand common ground needs to be met and compromises need to be made to please all people 
    I think that's a pretty terrible compromise. 12 weeks really is too early - it is quite easy to not know you're pregnant within the first trimester, especially for those who were actually using birth control, so have absolutely no reason to suspect anything.
    As for "compromises"... I think viability outside the body is a good basis for that, and even just logical "it's reasonable to know you're pregnant before then" thinking, but these compromises should NEVER EVER be based on pure moral opinion, like they are with Mitt Romney and most Republicans.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,909
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Just curious. Why do men have the financial burden of child support then? If the women has the only right to chose, shouldn't she be the only one financially responsible?
    For the record I think any deadbeat dad is a douche. But if I completely agreed with what you said, then why is he dragged into it if he doesn't want to? If he has no say, and it is only about the woman and her body and what she wants, then why force the dad into it? The dad can;t force an abortion if he doesn't want a kid.
    Just playing devil's advocate here.
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 4,244
    edited March 1
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
    Is there a process for aborting a viable fetus that does not result in its death?  
    If a fetus is removed and is still alive, then it is no longer part of the woman’s body...and should be given the medical care of any human being.  Then, if a woman chooses to abort the viable fetus, her rights to them should be terminated and the baby placed for adoption.  Being a bit silly here, so please do not take this completely seriously.
    We do all agree that once a viable fetus is removed from the body, they are no longer part of her body, right?  At that point all of the “it’s my body” talk would be irrelevant...  
    Again, just opening up more discussion, take this all with a grain of salt.
    Other animal fetuses have been grown in artificial wombs for a while now, so I would say that science is definitely lengthening the “viability” of embryos.  Pretty sure modern medicine has the ability to remove fetuses without a needle and vacuum these days...
    Post edited by PJPOWER on
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    edited March 1
    mace1229 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Just curious. Why do men have the financial burden of child support then? If the women has the only right to chose, shouldn't she be the only one financially responsible?
    For the record I think any deadbeat dad is a douche. But if I completely agreed with what you said, then why is he dragged into it if he doesn't want to? If he has no say, and it is only about the woman and her body and what she wants, then why force the dad into it? The dad can;t force an abortion if he doesn't want a kid.
    Just playing devil's advocate here.
    Because tough shit, that's why, lol. It's still his kid when it's born. Just because he can't stop women from aborting while the fetus is a part of her body and isn't viable outside of it, it doesn't mean the man's responsibility is gone when the baby becomes viable/born. What kind of fucked up logic is that? (I say to the devil, not you as advocate, lol)
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,527
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
    Are you sure about the 20 week premie surviving? I just tried to find this and could only find record of the earliest ever surviving premie at 21 weeks 6 days. Post a link if you can.  

    It it is certainly an issue that’s hotly discussed in terms of medical ethics, though, as the limits to viability creep gradually lower. One thing to remember is that premies  born at these very early ages generally have massive medical problems, so of course the other issue is, should we be resuscitating and treating them at 21, 22, 23 weeks, when the outcome is likely poor, and often catastrophic?

    I doubt we’ll see much additional further gains in early viability unless we do get that “artificial womb”, and then the whole conversation changes.  
    Yeah, kids that premature usually have major medical problems and a long road ahead of them. 
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    dignin said:
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
    Are you sure about the 20 week premie surviving? I just tried to find this and could only find record of the earliest ever surviving premie at 21 weeks 6 days. Post a link if you can.  

    It it is certainly an issue that’s hotly discussed in terms of medical ethics, though, as the limits to viability creep gradually lower. One thing to remember is that premies  born at these very early ages generally have massive medical problems, so of course the other issue is, should we be resuscitating and treating them at 21, 22, 23 weeks, when the outcome is likely poor, and often catastrophic?

    I doubt we’ll see much additional further gains in early viability unless we do get that “artificial womb”, and then the whole conversation changes.  
    Yeah, kids that premature usually have major medical problems and a long road ahead of them. 
    For sure. I don't particularly feel that extreme measures should be taken when babies are born that premature. Sometimes human scientific intervention is not the best way to go (despite the desperation of the parents).
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 871
    PJ_Soul said:
    riley540 said:
    I thought what Romney said in 2012 was a good compromise. The first trimester is ok. And after that it’s illegal. 
    I undertand common ground needs to be met and compromises need to be made to please all people 
    I think that's a pretty terrible compromise. 12 weeks really is too early - it is quite easy to not know you're pregnant within the first trimester, especially for those who were actually using birth control, so have absolutely no reason to suspect anything.
    As for "compromises"... I think viability outside the body is a good basis for that, and even just logical "it's reasonable to know you're pregnant before then" thinking, but these compromises should NEVER EVER be based on pure moral opinion, like they are with Mitt Romney and most Republicans.
    I personally strongly disagree and don’t believe in abortion from conception onward (which I explain above) I will respectfully disagree :) 


  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    I have no problem with people not believing in abortion at all. They can go ahead and never have an abortion. Great. My only problem is with people who don't believe in it telling other women what they should do (within reason, anyway, for me, but I'm no warrior for my own opinions on that).
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 4,244
    edited March 1
    PJ_Soul said:
    I have no problem with people not believing in abortion at all. They can go ahead and never have an abortion. Great. My only problem is with people who don't believe in it telling other women what they should do (within reason, anyway, for me, but I'm no warrior for my own opinions on that).
    I can agree with that with the addition that those apposed to it do not have one dime of their tax dollars going towards funding it directly or indirectly.
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,544
    I agree 16 weeks is too early for a hard deadline, given the difficulty that some women have in even confirming a pregnancy and then accessing medical care. If you have no money then a pregnancy test from the pharmacy is out of your reach. If you have no reasonable access to health care then even at best you face delay after delay after delay. 
    problem is, viabliity outside the womb is getting earlier all the time. my nephew was born at 23 or 24 weeks, which, at the time, 20 years ago, was (I believe) the earliest-born (or close to) surviving baby in manitoba. i recently read a baby born at 20 weeks survived. at 23 weeks he was a fully formed human being. small, but a full human. I cannot even fathom a baby at that stage being aborted. 

    I don't have the answers. 

    I hate the idea of abortion. 

    But I hate the idea of forcing someone's decision about their own body slightly more. 
    Are you sure about the 20 week premie surviving? I just tried to find this and could only find record of the earliest ever surviving premie at 21 weeks 6 days. Post a link if you can.  

    It it is certainly an issue that’s hotly discussed in terms of medical ethics, though, as the limits to viability creep gradually lower. One thing to remember is that premies  born at these very early ages generally have massive medical problems, so of course the other issue is, should we be resuscitating and treating them at 21, 22, 23 weeks, when the outcome is likely poor, and often catastrophic?

    I doubt we’ll see much additional further gains in early viability unless we do get that “artificial womb”, and then the whole conversation changes.  
    I was pretty sure it was 20 weeks. I could be wrong. I read the headline, not the article, and it was a bit ago. 

    one more reason my brother and his wife are people of faith. 23 weeks and 20 years later he has zero physical issues. except for his hamstrings being a bit too short so he often walks on his toes. 
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,544
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Just curious. Why do men have the financial burden of child support then? If the women has the only right to chose, shouldn't she be the only one financially responsible?
    For the record I think any deadbeat dad is a douche. But if I completely agreed with what you said, then why is he dragged into it if he doesn't want to? If he has no say, and it is only about the woman and her body and what she wants, then why force the dad into it? The dad can;t force an abortion if he doesn't want a kid.
    Just playing devil's advocate here.
    Because tough shit, that's why, lol. It's still his kid when it's born. Just because he can't stop women from aborting while the fetus is a part of her body and isn't viable outside of it, it doesn't mean the man's responsibility is gone when the baby becomes viable/born. What kind of fucked up logic is that? (I say to the devil, not you as advocate, lol)
    it's not fucked up logic whatsoever. what you are saying is:

    "I can kill this baby whether you like it or not, but if I don't, pay up"

    while I'm not saying that's not the way it should be, that's a pretty fucked up logic from the guy's point of view. 
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 10,411
    PJ_Soul said:
    mace1229 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Just curious. Why do men have the financial burden of child support then? If the women has the only right to chose, shouldn't she be the only one financially responsible?
    For the record I think any deadbeat dad is a douche. But if I completely agreed with what you said, then why is he dragged into it if he doesn't want to? If he has no say, and it is only about the woman and her body and what she wants, then why force the dad into it? The dad can;t force an abortion if he doesn't want a kid.
    Just playing devil's advocate here.
    Because tough shit, that's why, lol. It's still his kid when it's born. Just because he can't stop women from aborting while the fetus is a part of her body and isn't viable outside of it, it doesn't mean the man's responsibility is gone when the baby becomes viable/born. What kind of fucked up logic is that? (I say to the devil, not you as advocate, lol)
    it's not fucked up logic whatsoever. what you are saying is:

    "I can kill this baby whether you like it or not, but if I don't, pay up"

    while I'm not saying that's not the way it should be, that's a pretty fucked up logic from the guy's point of view. 
    Agreed.

    But unfortunately that's the way it is....cause in reality a guy telling a woman she has to go through with a pregnancy when she doesn't want to (assuming abortion is legal as it currently is), well that's pretty messed up too!

    Look - I am anti-abortion.  I would like it if it was no longer available.  And it's not based on any religion for me.  However, we are at a point in history where we are well past making it illegal.  That ain't going to happen...not overnight anyhow.  And you need lots of the things I mentioned already in place to reduce the number of abortions to the point you could...potentially...make it illegal.  

    But I do think we need to have a standard on how long it's an option.  And I do think it comes from medical viability, so the time frame could change with medical advancements.  I also do think we need to stop trying to silence men's opinions on the matter and figure out how best to deal with the fact that there could be potential fathers out there that do not have a say in their child's birth/abortion.  It may need to be be "tough"...but I'm wondering if there is a better way.  I don't have the answer.
    hippiemom = goodness
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,527
    mace1229 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJinIL said:
    Legal, in cases medical professionals would deem carrying full-term would be life threatening to the woman or baby. Not for mistakes/convenience/birth control.

    What I think about is if a man and woman have a consensual experience that results in a pregnancy...what are the father's rights? Next to zero at this point. Some pushes have been made for rights of a HUSBAND, but even those have been struck down.

    If the woman doesn't want it, sign the baby away to the dad. If that means the father pays for the prenatal care, medical bills, etc. so be it. That woman loses any visitation or other parental rights at that point.

    Not to be harsh, but when you get right down to it, my attitude is "tough shit for the man." Please don't mistake that for me thinking the father doesn't matter. He does. The problem is that it's still irrelevant. It's still the woman's body, and there is no getting around that IMO. Blame nature.
    Just curious. Why do men have the financial burden of child support then? If the women has the only right to chose, shouldn't she be the only one financially responsible?
    For the record I think any deadbeat dad is a douche. But if I completely agreed with what you said, then why is he dragged into it if he doesn't want to? If he has no say, and it is only about the woman and her body and what she wants, then why force the dad into it? The dad can;t force an abortion if he doesn't want a kid.
    Just playing devil's advocate here.
    The biological dad had his say when he had sex. It's kinda as simple as that.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,360
    edited March 1
    PJPOWER said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    I have no problem with people not believing in abortion at all. They can go ahead and never have an abortion. Great. My only problem is with people who don't believe in it telling other women what they should do (within reason, anyway, for me, but I'm no warrior for my own opinions on that).
    I can agree with that with the addition that those apposed to it do not have one dime of their tax dollars going towards funding it directly or indirectly.
    I would agree with that if I knew it wouldn't turn into a slippery slope situation, and I don't think anyone could ever assure people of that. If you start letting people choose where their tax dollars go for that, what's next? Education? Road works? Military spending (so many people would have a good argument for that one!)? I don't think anyone should ever encourage this kind of option.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
Sign In or Register to comment.