Seattle Homelessness

riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 872
The band has announced they are donating money to help the Seattle homeless issue. 

I live near near Seattle and I can see this issue first hand and it is pretty bad. There is a full tent city under the I5 just south of seattle. 

I feel like positive solutions are hard to reach. I’m curious to know what everyone thinks is a good step forward in the fight to end homelessness? 

I personally think we need to work on the drug problem. Both prescription and street drugs are ruining lives and making people unable to work. Drugs ruin lives and hurt families. 

I also think shelters are very usefull, but I feel like building them in the middle of the most expensive city in the area doesn’t do much, because the homeless people cannot afford anything. I think building a safe homeless community outside of town in an area where work is more accessible would be a great step forward. 

Just a few on my thoughts! What do you think? 
«134

Comments

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 25,008
    I agree that drugs can ruin lives and I think one of the solutions is NOT incarceration.  Instead, we should focus on providing counseling, treatment and rehab centers.  If all the money spent on incarcerating people for drugs were put toward rehab and counseling, we would have far fewer addicts and less crime.  That's pretty much a fact.

    However, is the homeless situation is not just a drug situation?  I don't think so.  It's also very much a mental health situation.  After all these years, how many Vietnam vets are still fucked up in the head and homeless?  A lot. Those guys should/should have (and I don't like the word "should" but here it fits) gotten more of the kind of help they needed.  That's a shameful mar on this country.

    So yes, more homeless shelter but why "outside town"?  I've talked to people who believe that is best and I highly suspect they say that because they don't want to see the reality.  It's called "NIMBY".    Some of these people (not saying you, Riley) think we should put them all on an island or fence off Nevada and stick them there or better yet,ship them off to Mars.  And is work really more accessible outside town?  It's not.  Town is where jobs are.  Town is where transportation is.

    I think the first step is to look at the problem realistically and not shove these people down a hole (again, not saying you are implying this, Riley).
    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 872
    brianlux said:
    I agree that drugs can ruin lives and I think one of the solutions is NOT incarceration.  Instead, we should focus on providing counseling, treatment and rehab centers.  If all the money spent on incarcerating people for drugs were put toward rehab and counseling, we would have far fewer addicts and less crime.  That's pretty much a fact.

    However, is the homeless situation is not just a drug situation?  I don't think so.  It's also very much a mental health situation.  After all these years, how many Vietnam vets are still fucked up in the head and homeless?  A lot. Those guys should/should have (and I don't like the word "should" but here it fits) gotten more of the kind of help they needed.  That's a shameful mar on this country.

    So yes, more homeless shelter but why "outside town"?  I've talked to people who believe that is best and I highly suspect they say that because they don't want to see the reality.  It's called "NIMBY".    Some of these people (not saying you, Riley) think we should put them all on an island or fence off Nevada and stick them there or better yet,ship them off to Mars.  And is work really more accessible outside town?  It's not.  Town is where jobs are.  Town is where transportation is.

    I think the first step is to look at the problem realistically and not shove these people down a hole (again, not saying you are implying this, Riley).
    I just know as a low income person myself, a big city provides almost zero opportunity for me. Living in a small town it is easier to make connections and my dollar goes a lot further. In Bellingham I was able to purchase a condo this year, where in Seattle it would be impossible. Which is why i reccomeneded outside of the large city. No negative thought behind it :-) 

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 25,008
    riley540 said:
    brianlux said:
    I agree that drugs can ruin lives and I think one of the solutions is NOT incarceration.  Instead, we should focus on providing counseling, treatment and rehab centers.  If all the money spent on incarcerating people for drugs were put toward rehab and counseling, we would have far fewer addicts and less crime.  That's pretty much a fact.

    However, is the homeless situation is not just a drug situation?  I don't think so.  It's also very much a mental health situation.  After all these years, how many Vietnam vets are still fucked up in the head and homeless?  A lot. Those guys should/should have (and I don't like the word "should" but here it fits) gotten more of the kind of help they needed.  That's a shameful mar on this country.

    So yes, more homeless shelter but why "outside town"?  I've talked to people who believe that is best and I highly suspect they say that because they don't want to see the reality.  It's called "NIMBY".    Some of these people (not saying you, Riley) think we should put them all on an island or fence off Nevada and stick them there or better yet,ship them off to Mars.  And is work really more accessible outside town?  It's not.  Town is where jobs are.  Town is where transportation is.

    I think the first step is to look at the problem realistically and not shove these people down a hole (again, not saying you are implying this, Riley).
    I just know as a low income person myself, a big city provides almost zero opportunity for me. Living in a small town it is easier to make connections and my dollar goes a lot further. In Bellingham I was able to purchase a condo this year, where in Seattle it would be impossible. Which is why i reccomeneded outside of the large city. No negative thought behind it :-) 

    Oh man, to me Bellingham is a big city! :lol:

    Bellingham, WA population: 87, 547 (2016)
    Placerville, CA (nearest city to my home) population: 10, 681 (2016)

    But see what you're saying.  Seattle really is a tough town in ways.  Reminds me one of Sherman Alexie's books, one in which he portrays well the difficult, gritty side of Seattle.  I can't remember which book.  One of the characters is a woman who drives a sandwich truck to feed the homeless.  A heart breaking story. 




    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 872
    brianlux said:
    riley540 said:
    brianlux said:
    I agree that drugs can ruin lives and I think one of the solutions is NOT incarceration.  Instead, we should focus on providing counseling, treatment and rehab centers.  If all the money spent on incarcerating people for drugs were put toward rehab and counseling, we would have far fewer addicts and less crime.  That's pretty much a fact.

    However, is the homeless situation is not just a drug situation?  I don't think so.  It's also very much a mental health situation.  After all these years, how many Vietnam vets are still fucked up in the head and homeless?  A lot. Those guys should/should have (and I don't like the word "should" but here it fits) gotten more of the kind of help they needed.  That's a shameful mar on this country.

    So yes, more homeless shelter but why "outside town"?  I've talked to people who believe that is best and I highly suspect they say that because they don't want to see the reality.  It's called "NIMBY".    Some of these people (not saying you, Riley) think we should put them all on an island or fence off Nevada and stick them there or better yet,ship them off to Mars.  And is work really more accessible outside town?  It's not.  Town is where jobs are.  Town is where transportation is.

    I think the first step is to look at the problem realistically and not shove these people down a hole (again, not saying you are implying this, Riley).
    I just know as a low income person myself, a big city provides almost zero opportunity for me. Living in a small town it is easier to make connections and my dollar goes a lot further. In Bellingham I was able to purchase a condo this year, where in Seattle it would be impossible. Which is why i reccomeneded outside of the large city. No negative thought behind it :-) 

    Oh man, to me Bellingham is a big city! :lol:

    Bellingham, WA population: 87, 547 (2016)
    Placerville, CA (nearest city to my home) population: 10, 681 (2016)

    But see what you're saying.  Seattle really is a tough town in ways.  Reminds me one of Sherman Alexie's books, one in which he portrays well the difficult, gritty side of Seattle.  I can't remember which book.  One of the characters is a woman who drives a sandwich truck to feed the homeless.  A heart breaking story. 




    I will have to find that book. It has been a while since I have had a good read :-) 

    and bellingham feels tiny being sandwiched between Vancouver B.C. and Seattle! Ha! 

    I also grew grew up in Anchorage Alaska which has over 300,000 people. The homeless issue in anchorage is brutal. Heart braking when you are driving in sub zero temps and you see people under bushes trying to stay warm. 
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 12,504
    It's bad and getting worse in Melbourne.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 12,504
    Not always drugs that cause homelessness.
    I asked one guy after I gave him money and he said his homelessness was due to a relationship breakdown (which is quite a common reason).
    I have seen women on the street due to domestic violence. I have seen guys on the street because their parents kicked them out of home because of their homosexuality.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,643
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 3,839
    UBI
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16 IL 08/18/18 IL 08/20/18
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,643
    Opioid commission member: Our work is a 'sham' - CNN https://apple.news/AQKG69JXRQ-uUS_RI6Dc4mQ
    Here you go another reason why there’s so many addicts that can’t get help hence they end up dead or on the streets ! This administration doesn’t care about anything that’s happening to the addicts they only cater to the 1% ...
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 12,283
    12 billionaires on the Forbes list from Seattle and over 68,000 millionaires in King County.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,511
    edited January 23
    I've read from several sources that up to 65% of the homeless are mentally ill to one degree or another. I think the homeless issue and the mental health care issue are very closely intertwined, and we all know that the mental health care system is generally very poor in North America. I don't think you can come close to fixing one without fixing the other. Even if all the billionaires in Seattle gave millions to the cause, the wouldn't do shit for the unmedicated schizophrenic or the bipolar crack addict or the alcoholic with psychosis, or the manic depressive abuse victim, or the vet with PTSD, if there isn't a really good mental health care system in place that can ACTUALLY help them in the ways they need help.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 25,008
    12 billionaires on the Forbes list from Seattle and over 68,000 millionaires in King County.
    That's pretty amazing (and awful), and yet as soon as you state such a statistic, someone will say, "Anybody who works at it hard enough can become a millionaire or even a billionaire".  I've never known quite how to respond to that except roll my eyes or ask, "Well then why are you [because, see, I've never had a millionaire tell me "anyone can become a millionaire] or I not millionaires?" .  That would mean less for them.


    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 25,008
    It seems that the City of Seattle is not inclined to want to help its homeless people:
    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/jan/24/anti-homeless-architecture-seattle-bike-racks-block-rough-sleepers

    New anti-homeless architecture: Seattle uses bike racks to block rough sleepers

    Police cleared a homeless camp before the transport department filled the pavement with unneeded bike racks – a clear case of hostile architecture which does not address the problem, say campaigners (More at link.)

    The article also illustrates "hostile" anti-homeless architecture in Manchester and London.  No doubt it's common in many other cities as well.




    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • PapPap Serres, GreecePosts: 20,184
    Ooh, yeah! All right!
    Were [Pearl] jammin
    I wanna [Pearl] jam it wid you.
    Were [Pearl] jammin, [Pearl] jammin
    And I hope you like [Pearl] jammin too.


    Sep 30, 2006 - OAKA Sports Hall - Athens, Greece
    Jul 11, 2014 - Milton Keynes Bowl - Milton Keynes, UK
  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 6,058
    Those Portraits of Homlessness are pretty profound, and beautiful and tragic at the same time. The reality is that Seattle has become a shithole. Under freeways, on sidewalks, in door jambs, in open spaces. Homeless camps are everywhere. Drug infested, crime infested, violence infested, garbage infested, rat infested, disease infested places full of criminals and the mentally ill in addition to those simply down on their luck. The city continues to try to find solutions. The city has spent millions and millions of dollars on this issue, but has not been able to make many dents. Hopefully the new mayor, with a fresh look at the issue, will be able to address the issue. It is creeping out of the city and into the suburbs as well. There are a lot of services available that many do not take advantage of due to rules. No drugs, no pets, no fighting, etc... So many choose to live in those camps even when offered alternatives. I have no problem with the city clearing out homeless camps. It is a public safety issue, both for the homeless themselves (murders, stabbings and shootings aren't uncommon), and for the rest of the citizenry. We can't allow lawlessness to take over the streets of the city, but at the same time we need to be compassionate about how we treat everyone. There is no simple, jingoistic solution to this issue. It is multi-faceted, and very complex. We can't just remove them all and expect them to pick themselves up. We also can't simply ignore the issue and allow the camps to grow and proliferate.
    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • JC29856JC29856 Posts: 9,617
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    “I used to spend a lot of time in this room...back when it was a shit hole and I was a shit head.”
    big·otˈbiɡət/ noun: a person who is intolerant toward those holding different opinions.
    big·ot·ryˈbiɡətrē/ noun: intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.

  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 6,058
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    That's very true, but with a city like Seattle, this wage disparity has been very profound over the past decade+. Amazon, primarily, and many other tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Zillow all have driven up net worth of their workers. Affordable housing used to exist in the city, and no longer does. Median income for married couples in Seattle as of last year was $133,000, 61% higher than the US median for couples. If you are a family of four making less than $72,000 you are considered low income.  Median home price in Seattle is just about $800,000. Many people who work in the city can no longer afford to live in the city (or if they do, it is in a homeless encampment). So sure, income disparity really started a few decades ago, but we've seen pretty obvious and rapid separation between the 1% and everyone else since the 80's.

    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,643
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    Yes i know it's the truth by the way 1960 is my yr what yr is yours young one ?
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • JC29856JC29856 Posts: 9,617
    jeffbr said:
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    That's very true, but with a city like Seattle, this wage disparity has been very profound over the past decade+. Amazon, primarily, and many other tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Zillow all have driven up net worth of their workers. Affordable housing used to exist in the city, and no longer does. Median income for married couples in Seattle as of last year was $133,000, 61% higher than the US median for couples. If you are a family of four making less than $72,000 you are considered low income.  Median home price in Seattle is just about $800,000. Many people who work in the city can no longer afford to live in the city (or if they do, it is in a homeless encampment). So sure, income disparity really started a few decades ago, but we've seen pretty obvious and rapid separation between the 1% and everyone else since the 80's.


    So what do you attribute the homeless problem to? Ive never been to Seattle aren't there affordable housing on the outskirts?
    “I used to spend a lot of time in this room...back when it was a shit hole and I was a shit head.”
    big·otˈbiɡət/ noun: a person who is intolerant toward those holding different opinions.
    big·ot·ryˈbiɡətrē/ noun: intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.

  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 6,058
    JC29856 said:
    jeffbr said:
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    That's very true, but with a city like Seattle, this wage disparity has been very profound over the past decade+. Amazon, primarily, and many other tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Zillow all have driven up net worth of their workers. Affordable housing used to exist in the city, and no longer does. Median income for married couples in Seattle as of last year was $133,000, 61% higher than the US median for couples. If you are a family of four making less than $72,000 you are considered low income.  Median home price in Seattle is just about $800,000. Many people who work in the city can no longer afford to live in the city (or if they do, it is in a homeless encampment). So sure, income disparity really started a few decades ago, but we've seen pretty obvious and rapid separation between the 1% and everyone else since the 80's.


    So what do you attribute the homeless problem to? Ive never been to Seattle aren't there affordable housing on the outskirts?
    Nothing illegal. Perhaps immoral. Unfettered greed primarily. The city created a friendly environment for tech companies, especially after seeing what Microsoft did to the region in the 90's. So big tech moved in bringing high paid transplanted workers from Silicon Valley, and a housing boom was created. The 2008 bubble hit, but recovery put things on an even more rapid trajectory. As tech jobs moved in, and housing prices went up, wages for non-tech workers in the city didn't follow pace. Suddenly people were stretched just trying to keep up with rent increases. Seattle is in King County. The county referenced above by Dwyer which has over 68,000 millionaires. So the outskirts are screwed, too. More affordable than in the city in many cases, but not affordable for regular working stiffs. I'm way east of the city, bordering a rural agricultural area, and pay $2,400/mo for a modest 1,400 sqft house. 5 years ago I was renting an identical floorplan 6 houses down for $1,900/mo. When people's wage increases are not commensurate with their rent increases, people suddenly find themselves in a quandry - move somewhere that might add hours to your daily commuting, find a job elsewhere away from the city, likely for less pay, and hope that it is enough to afford rent. Keep your job, but find alternative housing solutions. 

    That may explain some of the homeless issue. Much of it is also a mental illness crisis. We don't treat the mentally ill. We just try to figure out what to do with them once they're a "problem". 
    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 25,008
    JC29856 said:
    jeffbr said:
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    That's very true, but with a city like Seattle, this wage disparity has been very profound over the past decade+. Amazon, primarily, and many other tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Zillow all have driven up net worth of their workers. Affordable housing used to exist in the city, and no longer does. Median income for married couples in Seattle as of last year was $133,000, 61% higher than the US median for couples. If you are a family of four making less than $72,000 you are considered low income.  Median home price in Seattle is just about $800,000. Many people who work in the city can no longer afford to live in the city (or if they do, it is in a homeless encampment). So sure, income disparity really started a few decades ago, but we've seen pretty obvious and rapid separation between the 1% and everyone else since the 80's.


    So what do you attribute the homeless problem to? Ive never been to Seattle aren't there affordable housing on the outskirts?
    Not any more!  Even the Olympic Peninsula where I live for about 4 years has gotten expensive.  We looked at a few places in Carnation to the east of Seattle about 8 years ago and it was just barely affordable then.  Now?  No way!  Like California's Bay Area, much of Southern California, much of the greater Portland OR area, pretty much everything in the greater Puget Sound area is expensive now. 
    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 43,511
    edited January 24
    jeffbr said:
    JC29856 said:
    You can start here by fixing this huge problem that Republicans fail to see 
    The 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017 - CNN Money https://apple.news/AJRwwjCBQSa6ZP7jfqMvMrw
    I think you will find that the trend you post has been the case since your birth. (it didn't start in January of 2017)
    That's very true, but with a city like Seattle, this wage disparity has been very profound over the past decade+. Amazon, primarily, and many other tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Zillow all have driven up net worth of their workers. Affordable housing used to exist in the city, and no longer does. Median income for married couples in Seattle as of last year was $133,000, 61% higher than the US median for couples. If you are a family of four making less than $72,000 you are considered low income.  Median home price in Seattle is just about $800,000. Many people who work in the city can no longer afford to live in the city (or if they do, it is in a homeless encampment). So sure, income disparity really started a few decades ago, but we've seen pretty obvious and rapid separation between the 1% and everyone else since the 80's.

    This is what is going to destroy society, as long as people keep insisting that straight up capitalism works (which is CLEARLY does not).
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 12,504
    Seems like housing prices rising is a global trend.
    Why? Here they blame it on undersupply of housing.
    And in my city the Police can move on rough sleepers. Pretty inhumane.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 15,768
    12 billionaires on the Forbes list from Seattle and over 68,000 millionaires in King County.
    Wow!
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 14,919
    jeffbr said:
    Those Portraits of Homlessness are pretty profound, and beautiful and tragic at the same time. The reality is that Seattle has become a shithole. Under freeways, on sidewalks, in door jambs, in open spaces. Homeless camps are everywhere. Drug infested, crime infested, violence infested, garbage infested, rat infested, disease infested places full of criminals and the mentally ill in addition to those simply down on their luck. The city continues to try to find solutions. The city has spent millions and millions of dollars on this issue, but has not been able to make many dents. Hopefully the new mayor, with a fresh look at the issue, will be able to address the issue. It is creeping out of the city and into the suburbs as well. There are a lot of services available that many do not take advantage of due to rules. No drugs, no pets, no fighting, etc... So many choose to live in those camps even when offered alternatives. I have no problem with the city clearing out homeless camps. It is a public safety issue, both for the homeless themselves (murders, stabbings and shootings aren't uncommon), and for the rest of the citizenry. We can't allow lawlessness to take over the streets of the city, but at the same time we need to be compassionate about how we treat everyone. There is no simple, jingoistic solution to this issue. It is multi-faceted, and very complex. We can't just remove them all and expect them to pick themselves up. We also can't simply ignore the issue and allow the camps to grow and proliferate.
    I lived in Seattle part time from 95-97 and the homeless were a problem back then too.  There was a park that we were walking by one morning real early and there was a cop waking up the homeless telling them to move.

    Here in NY we see it getting bad too.  Over the past couple of years there would be a minimal amount of panhandlers whereas now there are 5x as many.  Some blame the mayor.  I'm not sure if it is his fault but there seems to be a bunch of people with mental issues roaming the streets now. 
    We can't lock them up anymore because of Reagan.  Psych wards are few and far between and not equipped to handle the amount of people that actually need the help.
    Holding a person against there will nowadays might not go over well so could we even bring back the psych wards to house them?
  • prismprism Posts: 2,440
    edited January 30
    I understand the intent of this thread is well meaning. However there seems to be a great deal of misinformation about the housing crisis, it’s causes and viable solutions. Undoubtedly  it’s a problem in the city of Seattle, and King Co. but it already extends all throughout Western WA. Which begs a question to the OP; how is it you haven’t noticed the huge increase in the number of homeless in the city of Bellingham in the last few years?

    Building more shelters isn't a fix. It’s not simply a matter of providing drug or alcohol rehab.  Nor providing mental health services in the assumption that’s all it takes to solve homelessness.  I’m not saying those things aren’t needed for some that are chronically homeless.  But many living on the streets in western WA don’t have any of these issues and/or work full-time jobs.  It’s really easy to blame the homeless,  well I’m just going to say, FUCK THAT! Everyone needs permanent housing they can afford.

    How do I know what I’m talking about? Last April I opened the door of my apt in Bellingham to find a 20-day notice to vacate. As did several of my other medically disabled neighbors.  In the 9 years I lived there I was a good tenant,  never did any damage or had a complaint against me. So WTF right? Quickly found out it’s totally legal  to kick month to month tenants to the curb with  just 20 days notice,  no reason required.  I did get legal help to negotiate staying another 30 days. Turns out the property management co. on behalf of the owners kicked everyone out in order to ‘remodel’ the units, thus jacking the rent from $660 to $1,200 a month. 

    Thankfully I have awesome, kind friends who let me stay and couch surf with them for 2 months,  due to medical issues I would have literally died out on the streets, or out in the woods.
     
    Given that I have 28 years of excellent  rental history (mostly long term) in Bellingham. And I have no criminal record. No pets. No mental illness. I don’t smoke, drink or do drugs. Always paid rent on time. I should’ve been able to find an apt no problem, right?  WRONG. None of that means a f’n thing to the vast majority of landlords and property managers.  As others have mentioned it boils down to GREED. Here they prey on naïve college students with whom they get a fast turnover (1 to 4 years)  to rent their dump. Then charge them huge fees and steal their security deposits, knowing students have neither the time or means to fight back. They only care about maximizing profits.
     
    For each apt complex in town I could recite the rent amount, who the LL or Management was, if they accept rental assistance, and obviously if they any vacancies. I’d lose my mind if I had recall every BS excuse & NO I got simply for asking nicely.  Most were at least somewhat considerate in saying no, while others were flat out asshats.  I went to numerous property management offices to hand out my rental resume, which were likely trashed without anyone reading it.

    There’s a number of obstacles low-income people face in finding a place to live. I’ll just address some of what I experienced in Bellingham.  Such as ‘source of income’ discrimination.  LLs and PMs requiring proof of employment with income 3x’s the rent.
    Age restrictions, being too young for many complexes which require tenants be 55 & over, no exceptions.
    Requiring first, & last months rent plus equal amount security deposit up front, which doesn’t include separate application  and administrative fees. Considering the average 1-bd in Bellingham rents for $950 a month (as of last Aug) do the math. How does someone on a limited income come up with that kind of  $$$. 

    Unfortunately  landlords and property managers have gobs of lobbyist on both the local & state level fighting for their right to be unrestricted greed monsters.  

    Here’s an article which covers much of what I’m talking about.  Despite my shyness  I got up and spoke at the town hall mentioned in the article,  and spoke another time in front of the Mayor and City council urging them to pass an ordinance to prohibit source of income discrimination.  http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article163116298.html  

    I have to give props to the Bellingham Tenants Union  for bringing many of these issues to light. I was approached last summer  by a couple of founding members who sought my input.  I’m grateful for their efforts trying to educate those that have turned a blind eye to the homeless crisis in Bellingham/ Whatcom Co. They ROCK!  https://www.facebook.com/BhamTenantUnion/
     Last but not least I'm incredibly happy that Pearl Jam is raising money and awareness for the many displaced/homeless people in Seattle.  :)

    Post edited by prism on
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
    angels share laughter
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 14,919
    prism said:
    I understand the intent of this thread is well meaning. However there seems to be a great deal of misinformation about the housing crisis, it’s causes and viable solutions. Undoubtedly  it’s a problem in the city of Seattle, and King Co. but it already extends all throughout Western WA. Which begs a question to the OP; how is it you haven’t noticed the huge increase in the number of homeless in the city of Bellingham in the last few years?

    Building more shelters isn't a fix. It’s not simply a matter of providing drug or alcohol rehab.  Nor providing mental health services in the assumption that’s all it takes to solve homelessness.  I’m not saying those things aren’t needed for some that are chronically homeless.  But many living on the streets in western WA don’t have any of these issues and/or work full-time jobs.  It’s really easy to blame the homeless,  well I’m just going to say, FUCK THAT! Everyone needs permanent housing they can afford.

    How do I know what I’m talking about? Last April I opened the door of my apt in Bellingham to find a 20-day notice to vacate. As did several of my other medically disabled neighbors.  In the 9 years I lived there I was a good tenant,  never did any damage or had a complaint against me. So WTF right? Quickly found out it’s totally legal  to kick month to month tenants to the curb with  just 20 days notice,  no reason required.  I did get legal help to negotiate staying another 30 days. Turns out the property management co. on behalf of the owners kicked everyone out in order to ‘remodel’ the units, thus jacking the rent from $660 to $1,200 a month. 

    Thankfully I have awesome, kind friends who let me stay and couch surf with them for 2 months,  due to medical issues I would have literally died out on the streets, or out in the woods.
     
    Given that I have 28 years of excellent  rental history (mostly long term) in Bellingham. And I have no criminal record. No pets. No mental illness. I don’t smoke, drink or do drugs. Always paid rent on time. I should’ve been able to find an apt no problem, right?  WRONG. None of that means a f’n thing to the vast majority of landlords and property managers.  As others have mentioned it boils down to GREED. Here they prey on naïve college students with whom they get a fast turnover (1 to 4 years)  to rent their dump. Then charge them huge fees and steal their security deposits, knowing students have neither the time or means to fight back. They only care about maximizing profits.
     
    For each apt complex in town I could recite the rent amount, who the LL or Management was, if they accept rental assistance, and obviously if they any vacancies. I’d lose my mind if I had recall every BS excuse & NO I got simply for asking nicely.  Most were at least somewhat considerate in saying no, while others were flat out asshats.  I went to numerous property management offices to hand out my rental resume, which were likely trashed without anyone reading it.

    There’s a number of obstacles low-income people face in finding a place to live. I’ll just address some of what I experienced in Bellingham.  Such as ‘source of income’ discrimination.  LLs and PMs requiring proof of employment with income 3x’s the rent.
    Age restrictions, being too young for many complexes which require tenants be 55 & over, no exceptions.
    Requiring first, & last months rent plus equal amount security deposit up front, which doesn’t include separate application  and administrative fees. Considering the average 1-bd in Bellingham rents for $950 a month (as of last Aug) do the math. How does someone on a limited income come up with that kind of  $$$. 

    Unfortunately  landlords and property managers have gobs of lobbyist on both the local & state level fighting for their right to be unrestricted greed monsters.  

    Here’s an article which covers much of what I’m talking about.  Despite my shyness  I got up and spoke at the town hall mentioned in the article,  and spoke another time in front of the Mayor and City council urging them to pass an ordinance to prohibit source of income discrimination.  http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article163116298.html  

    I have to give props to the Bellingham Tenants Union  for bringing many of these issues to light. I was approached last summer  by a couple of founding members who sought my input.  I’m grateful for their efforts trying to educate those that have turned a blind eye to the homeless crisis in Bellingham/ Whatcom Co. They ROCK!  https://www.facebook.com/BhamTenantUnion/
     Last but not least I'm incredibly happy that Pearl Jam is raising money and awareness for the many displaced/homeless people in Seattle.  :)

    San Francisco is experiencing the same problem as what you've described and they do have very strict laws to prevent "remodeling and rent hikes".
  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 872
    prism said:
    I understand the intent of this thread is well meaning. However there seems to be a great deal of misinformation about the housing crisis, it’s causes and viable solutions. Undoubtedly  it’s a problem in the city of Seattle, and King Co. but it already extends all throughout Western WA. Which begs a question to the OP; how is it you haven’t noticed the huge increase in the number of homeless in the city of Bellingham in the last few years?

    Building more shelters isn't a fix. It’s not simply a matter of providing drug or alcohol rehab.  Nor providing mental health services in the assumption that’s all it takes to solve homelessness.  I’m not saying those things aren’t needed for some that are chronically homeless.  But many living on the streets in western WA don’t have any of these issues and/or work full-time jobs.  It’s really easy to blame the homeless,  well I’m just going to say, FUCK THAT! Everyone needs permanent housing they can afford.

    How do I know what I’m talking about? Last April I opened the door of my apt in Bellingham to find a 20-day notice to vacate. As did several of my other medically disabled neighbors.  In the 9 years I lived there I was a good tenant,  never did any damage or had a complaint against me. So WTF right? Quickly found out it’s totally legal  to kick month to month tenants to the curb with  just 20 days notice,  no reason required.  I did get legal help to negotiate staying another 30 days. Turns out the property management co. on behalf of the owners kicked everyone out in order to ‘remodel’ the units, thus jacking the rent from $660 to $1,200 a month. 

    Thankfully I have awesome, kind friends who let me stay and couch surf with them for 2 months,  due to medical issues I would have literally died out on the streets, or out in the woods.
     
    Given that I have 28 years of excellent  rental history (mostly long term) in Bellingham. And I have no criminal record. No pets. No mental illness. I don’t smoke, drink or do drugs. Always paid rent on time. I should’ve been able to find an apt no problem, right?  WRONG. None of that means a f’n thing to the vast majority of landlords and property managers.  As others have mentioned it boils down to GREED. Here they prey on naïve college students with whom they get a fast turnover (1 to 4 years)  to rent their dump. Then charge them huge fees and steal their security deposits, knowing students have neither the time or means to fight back. They only care about maximizing profits.
     
    For each apt complex in town I could recite the rent amount, who the LL or Management was, if they accept rental assistance, and obviously if they any vacancies. I’d lose my mind if I had recall every BS excuse & NO I got simply for asking nicely.  Most were at least somewhat considerate in saying no, while others were flat out asshats.  I went to numerous property management offices to hand out my rental resume, which were likely trashed without anyone reading it.

    There’s a number of obstacles low-income people face in finding a place to live. I’ll just address some of what I experienced in Bellingham.  Such as ‘source of income’ discrimination.  LLs and PMs requiring proof of employment with income 3x’s the rent.
    Age restrictions, being too young for many complexes which require tenants be 55 & over, no exceptions.
    Requiring first, & last months rent plus equal amount security deposit up front, which doesn’t include separate application  and administrative fees. Considering the average 1-bd in Bellingham rents for $950 a month (as of last Aug) do the math. How does someone on a limited income come up with that kind of  $$$. 

    Unfortunately  landlords and property managers have gobs of lobbyist on both the local & state level fighting for their right to be unrestricted greed monsters.  

    Here’s an article which covers much of what I’m talking about.  Despite my shyness  I got up and spoke at the town hall mentioned in the article,  and spoke another time in front of the Mayor and City council urging them to pass an ordinance to prohibit source of income discrimination.  http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article163116298.html  

    I have to give props to the Bellingham Tenants Union  for bringing many of these issues to light. I was approached last summer  by a couple of founding members who sought my input.  I’m grateful for their efforts trying to educate those that have turned a blind eye to the homeless crisis in Bellingham/ Whatcom Co. They ROCK!  https://www.facebook.com/BhamTenantUnion/
     Last but not least I'm incredibly happy that Pearl Jam is raising money and awareness for the many displaced/homeless people in Seattle.  :)

    I have lived in Bellingham for the past two years now, and just bought a condo with my fiancé with an FHA loan, which is something that many HOAs in Bellingham have so that you can more easily afford to purchase a place. 
    We also rent our master bedroom and bathroom toba couple that goes to the community college. They signed a contract to live in our place. We are pretty relaxed people, but as property owners we reserve the right to ask them to leave at any time. 
    I know it’s shitty that you were asked to leave your place, but ultimately you don’t own it. 
    Bellingham is growing rapidly. There is a demand for housing, so the prices are going to rise. We listed our room for rent and we got offered $200 more for it than we were asking. 
    There are rumors that amazon wants to have a location near Bellingham which would give the community job growth. Something I learned a while back from an Econ teacher that I had is that the economy is its own breathing organism and we cant screw with it. 
    There are many charitable organizations and many good people who offer help to those less fortunate, but I you can’t afford to live in a city, maybe it isn’t the right city. 
    Stuff costs what people are willing to pay. 

    Justvmy opinion on things. We bought a condo as a long term rental investment, because real estate seems to be the thing over here in Bellingham. Going to school for my home inspection license next week! 

    Dont take this as me as me not wanting to help people, because I am a huge advocate for that. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 14,919
    riley540 said:
    prism said:
    I understand the intent of this thread is well meaning. However there seems to be a great deal of misinformation about the housing crisis, it’s causes and viable solutions. Undoubtedly  it’s a problem in the city of Seattle, and King Co. but it already extends all throughout Western WA. Which begs a question to the OP; how is it you haven’t noticed the huge increase in the number of homeless in the city of Bellingham in the last few years?

    Building more shelters isn't a fix. It’s not simply a matter of providing drug or alcohol rehab.  Nor providing mental health services in the assumption that’s all it takes to solve homelessness.  I’m not saying those things aren’t needed for some that are chronically homeless.  But many living on the streets in western WA don’t have any of these issues and/or work full-time jobs.  It’s really easy to blame the homeless,  well I’m just going to say, FUCK THAT! Everyone needs permanent housing they can afford.

    How do I know what I’m talking about? Last April I opened the door of my apt in Bellingham to find a 20-day notice to vacate. As did several of my other medically disabled neighbors.  In the 9 years I lived there I was a good tenant,  never did any damage or had a complaint against me. So WTF right? Quickly found out it’s totally legal  to kick month to month tenants to the curb with  just 20 days notice,  no reason required.  I did get legal help to negotiate staying another 30 days. Turns out the property management co. on behalf of the owners kicked everyone out in order to ‘remodel’ the units, thus jacking the rent from $660 to $1,200 a month. 

    Thankfully I have awesome, kind friends who let me stay and couch surf with them for 2 months,  due to medical issues I would have literally died out on the streets, or out in the woods.
     
    Given that I have 28 years of excellent  rental history (mostly long term) in Bellingham. And I have no criminal record. No pets. No mental illness. I don’t smoke, drink or do drugs. Always paid rent on time. I should’ve been able to find an apt no problem, right?  WRONG. None of that means a f’n thing to the vast majority of landlords and property managers.  As others have mentioned it boils down to GREED. Here they prey on naïve college students with whom they get a fast turnover (1 to 4 years)  to rent their dump. Then charge them huge fees and steal their security deposits, knowing students have neither the time or means to fight back. They only care about maximizing profits.
     
    For each apt complex in town I could recite the rent amount, who the LL or Management was, if they accept rental assistance, and obviously if they any vacancies. I’d lose my mind if I had recall every BS excuse & NO I got simply for asking nicely.  Most were at least somewhat considerate in saying no, while others were flat out asshats.  I went to numerous property management offices to hand out my rental resume, which were likely trashed without anyone reading it.

    There’s a number of obstacles low-income people face in finding a place to live. I’ll just address some of what I experienced in Bellingham.  Such as ‘source of income’ discrimination.  LLs and PMs requiring proof of employment with income 3x’s the rent.
    Age restrictions, being too young for many complexes which require tenants be 55 & over, no exceptions.
    Requiring first, & last months rent plus equal amount security deposit up front, which doesn’t include separate application  and administrative fees. Considering the average 1-bd in Bellingham rents for $950 a month (as of last Aug) do the math. How does someone on a limited income come up with that kind of  $$$. 

    Unfortunately  landlords and property managers have gobs of lobbyist on both the local & state level fighting for their right to be unrestricted greed monsters.  

    Here’s an article which covers much of what I’m talking about.  Despite my shyness  I got up and spoke at the town hall mentioned in the article,  and spoke another time in front of the Mayor and City council urging them to pass an ordinance to prohibit source of income discrimination.  http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article163116298.html  

    I have to give props to the Bellingham Tenants Union  for bringing many of these issues to light. I was approached last summer  by a couple of founding members who sought my input.  I’m grateful for their efforts trying to educate those that have turned a blind eye to the homeless crisis in Bellingham/ Whatcom Co. They ROCK!  https://www.facebook.com/BhamTenantUnion/
     Last but not least I'm incredibly happy that Pearl Jam is raising money and awareness for the many displaced/homeless people in Seattle.  :)

    I have lived in Bellingham for the past two years now, and just bought a condo with my fiancé with an FHA loan, which is something that many HOAs in Bellingham have so that you can more easily afford to purchase a place. 
    We also rent our master bedroom and bathroom toba couple that goes to the community college. They signed a contract to live in our place. We are pretty relaxed people, but as property owners we reserve the right to ask them to leave at any time. 
    I know it’s shitty that you were asked to leave your place, but ultimately you don’t own it. 
    Bellingham is growing rapidly. There is a demand for housing, so the prices are going to rise. We listed our room for rent and we got offered $200 more for it than we were asking. 
    There are rumors that amazon wants to have a location near Bellingham which would give the community job growth. Something I learned a while back from an Econ teacher that I had is that the economy is its own breathing organism and we cant screw with it. 
    There are many charitable organizations and many good people who offer help to those less fortunate, but I you can’t afford to live in a city, maybe it isn’t the right city. 
    Stuff costs what people are willing to pay. 

    Justvmy opinion on things. We bought a condo as a long term rental investment, because real estate seems to be the thing over here in Bellingham. Going to school for my home inspection license next week! 

    Dont take this as me as me not wanting to help people, because I am a huge advocate for that. 
    It almost sounds like if you didn't rent out your master bedroom that you couldn't live there either?!?
  • riley540riley540 Bellingham WAPosts: 872
    edited January 30
    riley540 said:
    prism said:
    I understand the intent of this thread is well meaning. However there seems to be a great deal of misinformation about the housing crisis, it’s causes and viable solutions. Undoubtedly  it’s a problem in the city of Seattle, and King Co. but it already extends all throughout Western WA. Which begs a question to the OP; how is it you haven’t noticed the huge increase in the number of homeless in the city of Bellingham in the last few years?

    Building more shelters isn't a fix. It’s not simply a matter of providing drug or alcohol rehab.  Nor providing mental health services in the assumption that’s all it takes to solve homelessness.  I’m not saying those things aren’t needed for some that are chronically homeless.  But many living on the streets in western WA don’t have any of these issues and/or work full-time jobs.  It’s really easy to blame the homeless,  well I’m just going to say, FUCK THAT! Everyone needs permanent housing they can afford.

    How do I know what I’m talking about? Last April I opened the door of my apt in Bellingham to find a 20-day notice to vacate. As did several of my other medically disabled neighbors.  In the 9 years I lived there I was a good tenant,  never did any damage or had a complaint against me. So WTF right? Quickly found out it’s totally legal  to kick month to month tenants to the curb with  just 20 days notice,  no reason required.  I did get legal help to negotiate staying another 30 days. Turns out the property management co. on behalf of the owners kicked everyone out in order to ‘remodel’ the units, thus jacking the rent from $660 to $1,200 a month. 

    Thankfully I have awesome, kind friends who let me stay and couch surf with them for 2 months,  due to medical issues I would have literally died out on the streets, or out in the woods.
     
    Given that I have 28 years of excellent  rental history (mostly long term) in Bellingham. And I have no criminal record. No pets. No mental illness. I don’t smoke, drink or do drugs. Always paid rent on time. I should’ve been able to find an apt no problem, right?  WRONG. None of that means a f’n thing to the vast majority of landlords and property managers.  As others have mentioned it boils down to GREED. Here they prey on naïve college students with whom they get a fast turnover (1 to 4 years)  to rent their dump. Then charge them huge fees and steal their security deposits, knowing students have neither the time or means to fight back. They only care about maximizing profits.
     
    For each apt complex in town I could recite the rent amount, who the LL or Management was, if they accept rental assistance, and obviously if they any vacancies. I’d lose my mind if I had recall every BS excuse & NO I got simply for asking nicely.  Most were at least somewhat considerate in saying no, while others were flat out asshats.  I went to numerous property management offices to hand out my rental resume, which were likely trashed without anyone reading it.

    There’s a number of obstacles low-income people face in finding a place to live. I’ll just address some of what I experienced in Bellingham.  Such as ‘source of income’ discrimination.  LLs and PMs requiring proof of employment with income 3x’s the rent.
    Age restrictions, being too young for many complexes which require tenants be 55 & over, no exceptions.
    Requiring first, & last months rent plus equal amount security deposit up front, which doesn’t include separate application  and administrative fees. Considering the average 1-bd in Bellingham rents for $950 a month (as of last Aug) do the math. How does someone on a limited income come up with that kind of  $$$. 

    Unfortunately  landlords and property managers have gobs of lobbyist on both the local & state level fighting for their right to be unrestricted greed monsters.  

    Here’s an article which covers much of what I’m talking about.  Despite my shyness  I got up and spoke at the town hall mentioned in the article,  and spoke another time in front of the Mayor and City council urging them to pass an ordinance to prohibit source of income discrimination.  http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article163116298.html  

    I have to give props to the Bellingham Tenants Union  for bringing many of these issues to light. I was approached last summer  by a couple of founding members who sought my input.  I’m grateful for their efforts trying to educate those that have turned a blind eye to the homeless crisis in Bellingham/ Whatcom Co. They ROCK!  https://www.facebook.com/BhamTenantUnion/
     Last but not least I'm incredibly happy that Pearl Jam is raising money and awareness for the many displaced/homeless people in Seattle.  :)

    I have lived in Bellingham for the past two years now, and just bought a condo with my fiancé with an FHA loan, which is something that many HOAs in Bellingham have so that you can more easily afford to purchase a place. 
    We also rent our master bedroom and bathroom toba couple that goes to the community college. They signed a contract to live in our place. We are pretty relaxed people, but as property owners we reserve the right to ask them to leave at any time. 
    I know it’s shitty that you were asked to leave your place, but ultimately you don’t own it. 
    Bellingham is growing rapidly. There is a demand for housing, so the prices are going to rise. We listed our room for rent and we got offered $200 more for it than we were asking. 
    There are rumors that amazon wants to have a location near Bellingham which would give the community job growth. Something I learned a while back from an Econ teacher that I had is that the economy is its own breathing organism and we cant screw with it. 
    There are many charitable organizations and many good people who offer help to those less fortunate, but I you can’t afford to live in a city, maybe it isn’t the right city. 
    Stuff costs what people are willing to pay. 

    Justvmy opinion on things. We bought a condo as a long term rental investment, because real estate seems to be the thing over here in Bellingham. Going to school for my home inspection license next week! 

    Dont take this as me as me not wanting to help people, because I am a huge advocate for that. 
    It almost sounds like if you didn't rent out your master bedroom that you couldn't live there either?!?
    If we have extra space and can cut down the mortgage cost, why wouldn’t we? I’m all about saving money! Which is why I don’t like renting, and why I have no issue renting extra space to friends 
«134
Sign In or Register to comment.