The Ocean. Fishing & Whaling. Sustainable? Illegal? Over fished?

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Comments

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    I also feel disgusted when I see the massive waste of single use plastics, especially from food service. 

    Recognizing that I'm only a tiny cog in the wheel, and that there's only so much I can do, I am trying to make one change at a time and stick with it long enough to make it a habit, and then add another change. The current change is that I'm taking a reusable travel mug with me any time that I think I might pick up a tea to go, so I can avoid a disposable cup with its inevitable plastic lid. 
    Great idea.  I have an 10 oz. insulated metal thermal mug for coffee and a stainless steel water bottle that pretty much go with me everywhere.
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    I think there are far too many people on planet earth ... 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    What you're saying reminds me of Earth Overshoot Day which comes earlier each year.  This year it comes on August 1st and at that rate, very soon we will be using up the annual resources provided by the planet at about half way through the year.  The end result of that is obvious.

    I'm almost 67 so I doubt I'll live to see the worst of the doomsday of which you speak but I don't know about kids living today.  But I truly am concerned that my 7 and 12 year old nieces may have to deal with the demise of society and all the ramifications of ecological breakdown, resource depletion and the chaos that will endue in their lifetime.  That's a heavy thought.
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    What you're saying reminds me of Earth Overshoot Day which comes earlier each year.  This year it comes on August 1st and at that rate, very soon we will be using up the annual resources provided by the planet at about half way through the year.  The end result of that is obvious.

    I'm almost 67 so I doubt I'll live to see the worst of the doomsday of which you speak but I don't know about kids living today.  But I truly am concerned that my 7 and 12 year old nieces may have to deal with the demise of society and all the ramifications of ecological breakdown, resource depletion and the chaos that will endue in their lifetime.  That's a heavy thought.

    Yup.

    I've got kids (21 and 17). I've encouraged them to not have kids. I've told them to enjoy their ride to the fullest and live their life in comfort and joy.

    I've also told them that if they do have kids, that I would be the best grandfather they could ever hope for.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    What you're saying reminds me of Earth Overshoot Day which comes earlier each year.  This year it comes on August 1st and at that rate, very soon we will be using up the annual resources provided by the planet at about half way through the year.  The end result of that is obvious.

    I'm almost 67 so I doubt I'll live to see the worst of the doomsday of which you speak but I don't know about kids living today.  But I truly am concerned that my 7 and 12 year old nieces may have to deal with the demise of society and all the ramifications of ecological breakdown, resource depletion and the chaos that will endue in their lifetime.  That's a heavy thought.

    Yup.

    I've got kids (21 and 17). I've encouraged them to not have kids. I've told them to enjoy their ride to the fullest and live their life in comfort and joy.

    I've also told them that if they do have kids, that I would be the best grandfather they could ever hope for.
    I believe you would be, Thirty.
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    What you're saying reminds me of Earth Overshoot Day which comes earlier each year.  This year it comes on August 1st and at that rate, very soon we will be using up the annual resources provided by the planet at about half way through the year.  The end result of that is obvious.

    I'm almost 67 so I doubt I'll live to see the worst of the doomsday of which you speak but I don't know about kids living today.  But I truly am concerned that my 7 and 12 year old nieces may have to deal with the demise of society and all the ramifications of ecological breakdown, resource depletion and the chaos that will endue in their lifetime.  That's a heavy thought.

    Yup.

    I've got kids (21 and 17). I've encouraged them to not have kids. I've told them to enjoy their ride to the fullest and live their life in comfort and joy.

    I've also told them that if they do have kids, that I would be the best grandfather they could ever hope for.
    I believe you would be, Thirty.
    Thanks Buddy!

    Seems like a good time to say it... I know we have had our issues in the past and I appreciate you looking beyond our differences and seeing whatever good you might see in me. I never liked those 'tenser' times and I like where we've come to.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Terrible!  And then add to that all the little micro-plastics submerged just below the surface that small sea life feed on and disrupt the food chain. 

    This is a good reminder to limit plastic use as much as possible and especially single-use plastics.  I attended a big double-birthday party the other day that had 75 guests with lots of catered food and ALL of the plates, cups and utensils were plastic.  That was disgusting enough but then on top of it,  people were dumping them in the trash.  We took several of the plastic items home to reuse.  Single use plastic is obscene.
    And just think... all that waste and it comes from one teeny weeny little corner of the earth. Simultaneously, at countless other corners of the earth, the same is occurring... day after day after day.

    It's depressing, but it's the reality. There's just no way we can sustain our current population and consumption habits. Humanity is doomed and doomsday is not that far away all things considered. I'm not deliberately trying to be a pessimist as much as I'm saying 'hold on to your hats'.

    None of us on this message board (or our kids) will feel the discomfort brought about by our activities to this point in time, but there will be a generation that suffers greatly. 
    What you're saying reminds me of Earth Overshoot Day which comes earlier each year.  This year it comes on August 1st and at that rate, very soon we will be using up the annual resources provided by the planet at about half way through the year.  The end result of that is obvious.

    I'm almost 67 so I doubt I'll live to see the worst of the doomsday of which you speak but I don't know about kids living today.  But I truly am concerned that my 7 and 12 year old nieces may have to deal with the demise of society and all the ramifications of ecological breakdown, resource depletion and the chaos that will endue in their lifetime.  That's a heavy thought.

    Yup.

    I've got kids (21 and 17). I've encouraged them to not have kids. I've told them to enjoy their ride to the fullest and live their life in comfort and joy.

    I've also told them that if they do have kids, that I would be the best grandfather they could ever hope for.
    I believe you would be, Thirty.
    Thanks Buddy!

    Seems like a good time to say it... I know we have had our issues in the past and I appreciate you looking beyond our differences and seeing whatever good you might see in me. I never liked those 'tenser' times and I like where we've come to.
    Thank you, Thirty.  The feeling is mutual.  :smile:
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 8,021
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 13,344
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 7,965
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.

    What about the practice of salmon "ranching"? Do you consider that part of sustainable fishing practices?
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 41,849
    edited August 2
    I get the impression that the oceans are in WAY worse shape that most people think. I firmly believe that there is a shitload of denial going on about it, because it's just too big a problem for people to accept or tackle. Ignorance is indeed bliss.

    Good example: I watched this surprisingly interesting documentary about jelly fish a while back... well, giant jelly fish are completely wreaking havoc on the Japanese fishing industry now - really, really bad problem - and the problem stems from climate change and pollution and fishing, and is spreading damn fast.
    Check this out: http://slowfood.com/slowfish/pagine/eng/pagina.lasso?-id_pg=172

    Domino Effect: The Jellyfish Example

    Disequilibrium in Ecosystems


    The threats facing the sea, all serious in their own right, are also combining to create new dangers. One surprising example is the proliferation of jellyfish, whose populations are increasing around the world, causing problems that go far beyond annoyance to swimmers.

    Natural jellyfish predators are disappearing. Bluefin tuna have been overfished almost to the point of extinction. Sea turtles, particularly leatherbacks and loggerheads, are also caught but mainly they are suffocating on all the plastic bags infesting the seas.

    Meanwhile, jellyfish are finding increasingly abundant food sources. The agricultural fertilizers pouring into the sea from farms are encouraging the growth of plankton, while overfishing is depleting the stocks of small fish like sardines which would normally also feed on plankton.

    In the absence of predators and competition for food, jellyfish populations are growing unchecked. The trend is amplified by climate change and increasingly warm waters. The latest scientific research has shown that in certain zones, such as along the coast of Namibia, the biomass of jellyfish has already exceeded that of fish.

    The jellyfish example shows how attacks on the marine ecosystem disturb the delicate equilibrium of the food chain, with cascading consequences making it very difficult for humans to find suitable solutions. The problem of marine resources must be tackled from many different angles.




    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    PJ_Soul said:
    I get the impression that the oceans are in WAY worse shape that most people think. I firmly believe that there is a shitload of denial going on about it, because it's just too big a problem for people to accept or tackle. Ignorance is indeed bliss.

    Good example: I watched this surprisingly interesting documentary about jelly fish a while back... well, giant jelly fish are completely wreaking havoc on the Japanese fishing industry now - really, really bad problem - and the problem stems from climate change and pollution and fishing, and is spreading damn fast.
    Check this out: http://slowfood.com/slowfish/pagine/eng/pagina.lasso?-id_pg=172

    Domino Effect: The Jellyfish Example

    Disequilibrium in Ecosystems


    The threats facing the sea, all serious in their own right, are also combining to create new dangers. One surprising example is the proliferation of jellyfish, whose populations are increasing around the world, causing problems that go far beyond annoyance to swimmers.

    Natural jellyfish predators are disappearing. Bluefin tuna have been overfished almost to the point of extinction. Sea turtles, particularly leatherbacks and loggerheads, are also caught but mainly they are suffocating on all the plastic bags infesting the seas.

    Meanwhile, jellyfish are finding increasingly abundant food sources. The agricultural fertilizers pouring into the sea from farms are encouraging the growth of plankton, while overfishing is depleting the stocks of small fish like sardines which would normally also feed on plankton.

    In the absence of predators and competition for food, jellyfish populations are growing unchecked. The trend is amplified by climate change and increasingly warm waters. The latest scientific research has shown that in certain zones, such as along the coast of Namibia, the biomass of jellyfish has already exceeded that of fish.

    The jellyfish example shows how attacks on the marine ecosystem disturb the delicate equilibrium of the food chain, with cascading consequences making it very difficult for humans to find suitable solutions. The problem of marine resources must be tackled from many different angles.




    Exactly and well put, Allison.  We are in deep shit, way more than most people know or are willing to look at.  The oceans are our alpha and our omega.  We might be pushing ourselves to the brink faster than we realize.  But as soon as someone like me says something like that, a chorus of "Doomsayer!" rises through the fog of denial and the messenger is shot down. 

    More than the hellacious fires raging through North America, more than climate change, more than the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch, more even than rapid overall species extinction, my own belief is that ocean death is our biggest looming catastrophe and well ought to be our biggest concern.

    I don't tell people what to do or what to eat but I would love to hear someone say to me, "Yeah, I'll join you in abstaining from eating ocean fish and all seafood other than sea vegetables."  That would make my heart happy.
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 3,216
    I just read all this thread and it's wonderful . We as a world need change. I watched a programme  on sewage and the amount that is pumped 1 mile off shore that is not fit to drink after partial purification is horrible.  
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    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
  • mike86mike86 Posts: 156
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.

    What about the practice of salmon "ranching"? Do you consider that part of sustainable fishing practices?
    https://seashepherd.org/campaigns/virushunter/

    here's a lin thats really interesting and talking about that topic. 
    Follow the Strangest Tribe
  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 8,021
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 13,344
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    mike86 said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.

    What about the practice of salmon "ranching"? Do you consider that part of sustainable fishing practices?
    https://seashepherd.org/campaigns/virushunter/

    here's a lin thats really interesting and talking about that topic. 
    Last year we went down to S.F. to meet and great the crew of the R/V Martin Sheen that is working that campaign.  What a wonderful, dedicated group of folks!  Some of the crew had taken off from their regular work for a year to volunteer.  The ships cook left her work to volunteer full time permanently with the R/V Martin Sheen crew. 


    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
    Yes, and it has such huge expanses of wilderness.  I just hope that the most habitable parts of that state don't become over-run in the not-to-distant future.
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
    Yes, and it has such huge expanses of wilderness.  I just hope that the most habitable parts of that state don't become over-run in the not-to-distant future.
    Over - run by people?  I do not think that will happen, if that's what you mean.  If not I apologize.  Alaska is to cold for most people, which is why people flock to California ... mostly nice weather.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    I'd live in Alaska over California ... less people.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
    Yes, and it has such huge expanses of wilderness.  I just hope that the most habitable parts of that state don't become over-run in the not-to-distant future.
    Over - run by people?  I do not think that will happen, if that's what you mean.  If not I apologize.  Alaska is to cold for most people, which is why people flock to California ... mostly nice weather.
    Most of the state, not likely because of the weather and very short winter daylight.  But some of the southern town and cities I do believe will become over populated as people move north because of drought, fires and crowding in places like California (and more recently Oregon and Washington).

    I'd live in Alaska over California ... less people.
    We're actually kind of mulling that over possibility.
     
    And not to offend or be that nagging grammar policed but it's "fewer people".  :smile:
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 1,843
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
    Yes, and it has such huge expanses of wilderness.  I just hope that the most habitable parts of that state don't become over-run in the not-to-distant future.
    Over - run by people?  I do not think that will happen, if that's what you mean.  If not I apologize.  Alaska is to cold for most people, which is why people flock to California ... mostly nice weather.
    Most of the state, not likely because of the weather and very short winter daylight.  But some of the southern town and cities I do believe will become over populated as people move north because of drought, fires and crowding in places like California (and more recently Oregon and Washington).

    I'd live in Alaska over California ... less people.
    We're actually kind of mulling that over possibility.
     
    And not to offend or be that nagging grammar policed but it's "fewer people".  :smile:
    :angry: This place is getting just as bad as facebook for the grammar police...


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    That shows you what I know.  Maybe Alaska has an abundance of wildlife and fish because it is the lowest populated state ...
    Yes, and it has such huge expanses of wilderness.  I just hope that the most habitable parts of that state don't become over-run in the not-to-distant future.
    Over - run by people?  I do not think that will happen, if that's what you mean.  If not I apologize.  Alaska is to cold for most people, which is why people flock to California ... mostly nice weather.
    Most of the state, not likely because of the weather and very short winter daylight.  But some of the southern town and cities I do believe will become over populated as people move north because of drought, fires and crowding in places like California (and more recently Oregon and Washington).

    I'd live in Alaska over California ... less people.
    We're actually kind of mulling that over possibility.
     
    And not to offend or be that nagging grammar policed but it's "fewer people".  :smile:
    :angry: This place is getting just as bad as facebook for the grammar police...


    LOL,  it's just that I used to mix up "few"  and "less" fairly often and now my wife has me trained on that one.  And it only took me 15 years to get it right.... most of the time.  :lol:
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 13,344
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    OK when it comes to fishing Alaska does a great job in conservation and sustainability.

    I've mentioned this before and I'll repeat it.  Here is what started it all.

    Alaska had all but fished out Alaskan King crab to the point of 10% of it's population in the late 70's.  It was so low that they never thought that it would replenish itself.  Because of this Alaska wrote into their constitution sustainability so that the travesty of the King Crab loss would never happen again.

    Alaska had developed quotas and have observers on fishing vessels to track the fish population whether it be fish or crab.

    I got to see this as I was working up there in the fishing industry for 2 years. 

    It truly is amazing in what they have accomplished.

    Salmon still have free run there with the hatcheries that help promote population.

    There are two fish species that thrive in Alaska that have been all but fished to extinction in the Atlantic.  Those are Cod and Salmon.

    I always praise Alaska for what they have done with their fishing industry and maintaining sustainability.

    Tuna is the next fish species that should be protected.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,215
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    OK when it comes to fishing Alaska does a great job in conservation and sustainability.

    I've mentioned this before and I'll repeat it.  Here is what started it all.

    Alaska had all but fished out Alaskan King crab to the point of 10% of it's population in the late 70's.  It was so low that they never thought that it would replenish itself.  Because of this Alaska wrote into their constitution sustainability so that the travesty of the King Crab loss would never happen again.

    Alaska had developed quotas and have observers on fishing vessels to track the fish population whether it be fish or crab.

    I got to see this as I was working up there in the fishing industry for 2 years. 

    It truly is amazing in what they have accomplished.

    Salmon still have free run there with the hatcheries that help promote population.

    There are two fish species that thrive in Alaska that have been all but fished to extinction in the Atlantic.  Those are Cod and Salmon.

    I always praise Alaska for what they have done with their fishing industry and maintaining sustainability.

    Tuna is the next fish species that should be protected.
    I hope you're right about that but I'm still boycotting all sea food all the time for the rest of my life.  Like my Pop used to say, "I'm a stubborn Dutchman."
    "We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are."
    -James Baldwin
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.




  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 13,344
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Fishing, when done right, like in Alaska, is sustainable.
    Choosing to miss the point.
    I guess you missed mine in that if done right the fish population can still be saved. 

    Good points.  Alaska seems to do a good job at conservation.  Alaska is a fascinating State.  It's on my bucket list of destinations.
    One would think so, but according to this article they rank about in the middle:

    My step daughter just started a new job in Alaska as the Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce for Ketchikan Alaska, so it's an almost sure thing we will visit up there next year- my first time!  Ketchikan sound s like a cool (as in weather and culture) place to visit.  looking forward to it.

    OK when it comes to fishing Alaska does a great job in conservation and sustainability.

    I've mentioned this before and I'll repeat it.  Here is what started it all.

    Alaska had all but fished out Alaskan King crab to the point of 10% of it's population in the late 70's.  It was so low that they never thought that it would replenish itself.  Because of this Alaska wrote into their constitution sustainability so that the travesty of the King Crab loss would never happen again.

    Alaska had developed quotas and have observers on fishing vessels to track the fish population whether it be fish or crab.

    I got to see this as I was working up there in the fishing industry for 2 years. 

    It truly is amazing in what they have accomplished.

    Salmon still have free run there with the hatcheries that help promote population.

    There are two fish species that thrive in Alaska that have been all but fished to extinction in the Atlantic.  Those are Cod and Salmon.

    I always praise Alaska for what they have done with their fishing industry and maintaining sustainability.

    Tuna is the next fish species that should be protected.
    I hope you're right about that but I'm still boycotting all sea food all the time for the rest of my life.  Like my Pop used to say, "I'm a stubborn Dutchman."
    @brianlux Please do me a favor and read up on the King crab biomass loss in the late 70's.  What is happening now is purely amazing with the catches now.

    I actually own the NatGeo magazine that discusses the crab crash.

    When I was in Alaska there were certain ships that were transformed into fishing boats rather than crab boats.  There were a bunch of vessels that made the change from crab to fish because there was no crab to catch.  Cod, salmon or pollock was the way to go to still make money.

    It is such a fascinating subject to me.
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