Start another marijuana thread, please.

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Comments

  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 5,215

    I've never tried marijuana but have always been curious of how it would feel to be high.
    The reason I have not tried it is because there is evidence that it leads to schizophrenia and bad psychosis.
    For all you smokers on here, do you not feel worried that you may develop schizophrenia?
    My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana.
    Plus, I am a university student, don't need marijuana making me unmotivated and affecting my memory and concentration.

    I'm not aware of any studies showing a causal relationship between marijuana and schizophrenia. Do you have a source? I know that there may be an increased risk if a person has other genetic risk factors for the psychosis. But at this point smoking marijuana has never been shown to cause schizophrenia as far as I know.
    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 7,780

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    edited January 25
    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Post edited by oftenreading on
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 7,780

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    rgambs said:

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    The problem with your analogy is that getting hit by lightning is a rare event, with a risk of one in many thousand over one's lifetime, whereas schizophrenia is not rare. The rate of schizophrenia is 1% in the population, and early use of cannabis appears to increase it by up to 3 times. That is not insignificant, particularly for those who develop schizophrenia, a devastating condition.

    And I won't argue with you about what people should or shouldn't avoid to reduce the risk of psychosis, but TA asked about cannabis so that's what I answered.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 12,019
    puff puff pass
  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 5,215

    rgambs said:

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    The problem with your analogy is that getting hit by lightning is a rare event, with a risk of one in many thousand over one's lifetime, whereas schizophrenia is not rare. The rate of schizophrenia is 1% in the population, and early use of cannabis appears to increase it by up to 3 times. That is not insignificant, particularly for those who develop schizophrenia, a devastating condition.

    And I won't argue with you about what people should or shouldn't avoid to reduce the risk of psychosis, but TA asked about cannabis so that's what I answered.
    When I responded to the initial post, this sentence is what caught my eye: "My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana." My point is that there is simply no causality established. A potential contributing factor to exacerbation? Perhaps. Maybe even probably. But not causal. Unless someone can show me a peer reviewed study establishing causality I will continue to rely on the studies that do exist, which explicitly state that "The results of the current study suggest that having an increased familial morbid risk for schizophrenia may be the underlying basis for schizophrenia in cannabis users and not cannabis use by itself." (From A controlled family study of cannabis users with and without psychosis)

    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    edited January 25
    jeffbr said:

    rgambs said:

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    The problem with your analogy is that getting hit by lightning is a rare event, with a risk of one in many thousand over one's lifetime, whereas schizophrenia is not rare. The rate of schizophrenia is 1% in the population, and early use of cannabis appears to increase it by up to 3 times. That is not insignificant, particularly for those who develop schizophrenia, a devastating condition.

    And I won't argue with you about what people should or shouldn't avoid to reduce the risk of psychosis, but TA asked about cannabis so that's what I answered.
    When I responded to the initial post, this sentence is what caught my eye: "My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana." My point is that there is simply no causality established. A potential contributing factor to exacerbation? Perhaps. Maybe even probably. But not causal. Unless someone can show me a peer reviewed study establishing causality I will continue to rely on the studies that do exist, which explicitly state that "The results of the current study suggest that having an increased familial morbid risk for schizophrenia may be the underlying basis for schizophrenia in cannabis users and not cannabis use by itself." (From A controlled family study of cannabis users with and without psychosis)

    That study (which is one study, not "studies"), doesn't show that cannabis use isn't a factor in development of psychotic disorders. It is underpowered to answer that question (i.e. not enough subjects. I don't think anyone would argue that family history isn't significant; that's well documented.

    For the question of the link between cannabis use and psychotic disorders you need larger epidemiological studies. I'll post some later, when I get time.

    Edit: but I don't disagree that you can't tell in any individual circumstance whether development of a psychotic disorder is related to cannabis use or not.
    Post edited by oftenreading on
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 5,215

    jeffbr said:

    rgambs said:

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    The problem with your analogy is that getting hit by lightning is a rare event, with a risk of one in many thousand over one's lifetime, whereas schizophrenia is not rare. The rate of schizophrenia is 1% in the population, and early use of cannabis appears to increase it by up to 3 times. That is not insignificant, particularly for those who develop schizophrenia, a devastating condition.

    And I won't argue with you about what people should or shouldn't avoid to reduce the risk of psychosis, but TA asked about cannabis so that's what I answered.
    When I responded to the initial post, this sentence is what caught my eye: "My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana." My point is that there is simply no causality established. A potential contributing factor to exacerbation? Perhaps. Maybe even probably. But not causal. Unless someone can show me a peer reviewed study establishing causality I will continue to rely on the studies that do exist, which explicitly state that "The results of the current study suggest that having an increased familial morbid risk for schizophrenia may be the underlying basis for schizophrenia in cannabis users and not cannabis use by itself." (From A controlled family study of cannabis users with and without psychosis)

    That study (which is one study, not "studies"), doesn't show that cannabis use isn't a factor in development of psychotic disorders. It is underpowered to answer that question (i.e. not enough subjects. I don't think anyone would argue that family history isn't significant; that's well documented.

    For the question of the link between cannabis use and psychotic disorders you need larger epidemiological studies. I'll post some later, when I get time.

    Edit: but I don't disagree that you can't tell in any individual circumstance whether development of a psychotic disorder is related to cannabis use or not.
    I don't disagree with anything you just said. I believe there are links as well, and there are numerous studies that make the claim. Perhaps I wasn't being clear. My issue is with someone saying cannabis caused schizophrenia. That is where I jump in with a request for a peer reviewed study (preferably done this decade) showing causation. Pot can certainly contribute to psychosis. But does pot cause psychosis?
    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    jeffbr said:

    jeffbr said:

    rgambs said:

    rgambs said:

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    You two are both vastly overstating the link between psychosis and cannabis!
    Not for developing brains, no.

    Edit: and I would add, how can you possibly say someone is "vastly overstating" something when I've offered no figures or estimate of risk, other than to say there is a link? If you think that's vastly overstated, that would suggest you think there is no link, in which case you would be incorrect.
    Figures or not, your tone established it as a serious risk. It is a minor link that isn't understood and you may as well coach someone to seriously consider staying indoors to avoid lightning or falling tree limbs.

    If a person is really that concerned about psychosis, all mind-altering substances should probably be avoided.
    The problem with your analogy is that getting hit by lightning is a rare event, with a risk of one in many thousand over one's lifetime, whereas schizophrenia is not rare. The rate of schizophrenia is 1% in the population, and early use of cannabis appears to increase it by up to 3 times. That is not insignificant, particularly for those who develop schizophrenia, a devastating condition.

    And I won't argue with you about what people should or shouldn't avoid to reduce the risk of psychosis, but TA asked about cannabis so that's what I answered.
    When I responded to the initial post, this sentence is what caught my eye: "My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana." My point is that there is simply no causality established. A potential contributing factor to exacerbation? Perhaps. Maybe even probably. But not causal. Unless someone can show me a peer reviewed study establishing causality I will continue to rely on the studies that do exist, which explicitly state that "The results of the current study suggest that having an increased familial morbid risk for schizophrenia may be the underlying basis for schizophrenia in cannabis users and not cannabis use by itself." (From A controlled family study of cannabis users with and without psychosis)

    That study (which is one study, not "studies"), doesn't show that cannabis use isn't a factor in development of psychotic disorders. It is underpowered to answer that question (i.e. not enough subjects. I don't think anyone would argue that family history isn't significant; that's well documented.

    For the question of the link between cannabis use and psychotic disorders you need larger epidemiological studies. I'll post some later, when I get time.

    Edit: but I don't disagree that you can't tell in any individual circumstance whether development of a psychotic disorder is related to cannabis use or not.
    I don't disagree with anything you just said. I believe there are links as well, and there are numerous studies that make the claim. Perhaps I wasn't being clear. My issue is with someone saying cannabis caused schizophrenia. That is where I jump in with a request for a peer reviewed study (preferably done this decade) showing causation. Pot can certainly contribute to psychosis. But does pot cause psychosis?
    I don't think that question is answerable at this point. The available data suggests that schizophrenia, like many medical conditions, had a number of potential contributing factors. There is almost certainly a need for a genetic vulnerability, which will likely not be sufficient on its own. Even identical twins do not have 100% concordance for schizophrenia, or even close to 100%. There is no identied single gene or gene complex, but rather multiple different contributors. Then we have the non-genetic risk factors, of which there are many and the risks are probably additive. Things as diverse as maternal influenza infection during pregnancy and older paternal age are factors. Cannabis use is one of these factors but it's unrealistic to expect that anyone could say that it was the single causative factor. However, if you had a 14 year old who had about a 2-3% risk of developing schizophrenia without cannabis use but maybe close to 10% risk with cannabis use, would you feel good about dismissing it as a contributing factor even if it isn't "causative"?
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 10,219
    jeffbr said:

    I've never tried marijuana but have always been curious of how it would feel to be high.
    The reason I have not tried it is because there is evidence that it leads to schizophrenia and bad psychosis.
    For all you smokers on here, do you not feel worried that you may develop schizophrenia?
    My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana.
    Plus, I am a university student, don't need marijuana making me unmotivated and affecting my memory and concentration.

    I'm not aware of any studies showing a causal relationship between marijuana and schizophrenia. Do you have a source? I know that there may be an increased risk if a person has other genetic risk factors for the psychosis. But at this point smoking marijuana has never been shown to cause schizophrenia as far as I know.
    Various reports I've read online from medical professionals. Google it.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 10,219

    Thoughts_Arrive, you are correct that there is a clear link between cannabis use and development of psychosis, particularly but not only in those who started use quite young (early/mid teens) and who are heavy users. I don't know your age but if you are a university student perhaps you are young, maybe still in your teens. Your risk would be particularly elevated if you have other risk factors, such as a history of psychosis in someone who is genetically related (I'm guessing you're BIL's brother is not a genetic relative, but think about your own siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents, etc).

    Most of the risk would be related to long term or heavy use, not occasional use, but you are the only one who can judge whether you want to try it or not.

    Wrong. I am 32. A mature age student!
    Well my brother in laws mum was mentally unwell. His brother is a half brother, same mother.
    I am concerned about my cousin who smokes a lot every day and he started young.
    I am on SSRI medication for depression/anxiety issues but I feel great now.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 10,219
    I am thinking, what about long time smokers such as Willie Nelson, he is mentally fine from what I understand.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238

    Correlation does not equal causality.

    Absolutely, and well designed studies take this into account.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 7,764
    Thoughts_Arrive... Just wanted to mention that I did not smoke pot until my 31st birthday. I'm not sure what difference that makes, but you mentioned you were 32 so I figured I'd throw it out there.

    There are two main strains of marijuana - sativa and indica.

    If you are curious about trying it but are also worried about long term effects and mental illness, I would recommend sativa. Sativas give a more energetic, stimulating high. They can help with focus, awareness, energy, give uplifting thoughts, and promote creativity. Sativas are actually given to medical marijuana patients to help with depression, ADHD, and other mental disorders. They are often given to cancer patients as they help reduce fatigue. Sativas are given to those with eating disorders as they promote hunger. It's the "get shit done" strain. Sour diesel, blue dream, Jack Herer, and almost anything named "haze" are all sativa strains. Most have a woodsy, piney aroma & taste.

    Conversely, indicas are the couch-lock strain. That is what you want when you get home from work and just want to relax and take a load off. Almost anything named "kush" will be an indica strain. Northern lights, white rhino, Skywalker are also examples. Indicas are more fruity in nature. They are typically prescribed to medical patients to help with insomnia, pain relief, muscle relaxation, and nausea. They are the strain you read about as usually suggested to having a link with developing mental disorders. (Again, correlation does not equate causality. But if you're concerned about the link, indica is the one you're leery of.)

    That's not to say if you smoke some Berry Kush that you'll develop a mental disorder. As oftenreading said, most cases are linked to prolonged, heavy usage. Most casual and even daily smokers will never have any issues. Like Willie Nelson or Snoop Dogg.

    I'd also like to reiterate another thing oftenreading said. Only you can determine if you want to try it or not. I'm just trying to give you some helpful info. If a fellow pot smoker ever tries to impose their will or pressure you into it, that's not a person you want to be around. Most pot smokers have a code of honor about this, but there's always a few bad apples.
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 10,219

    Thoughts_Arrive... Just wanted to mention that I did not smoke pot until my 31st birthday. I'm not sure what difference that makes, but you mentioned you were 32 so I figured I'd throw it out there.

    There are two main strains of marijuana - sativa and indica.

    If you are curious about trying it but are also worried about long term effects and mental illness, I would recommend sativa. Sativas give a more energetic, stimulating high. They can help with focus, awareness, energy, give uplifting thoughts, and promote creativity. Sativas are actually given to medical marijuana patients to help with depression, ADHD, and other mental disorders. They are often given to cancer patients as they help reduce fatigue. Sativas are given to those with eating disorders as they promote hunger. It's the "get shit done" strain. Sour diesel, blue dream, Jack Herer, and almost anything named "haze" are all sativa strains. Most have a woodsy, piney aroma & taste.

    Conversely, indicas are the couch-lock strain. That is what you want when you get home from work and just want to relax and take a load off. Almost anything named "kush" will be an indica strain. Northern lights, white rhino, Skywalker are also examples. Indicas are more fruity in nature. They are typically prescribed to medical patients to help with insomnia, pain relief, muscle relaxation, and nausea. They are the strain you read about as usually suggested to having a link with developing mental disorders. (Again, correlation does not equate causality. But if you're concerned about the link, indica is the one you're leery of.)

    That's not to say if you smoke some Berry Kush that you'll develop a mental disorder. As oftenreading said, most cases are linked to prolonged, heavy usage. Most casual and even daily smokers will never have any issues. Like Willie Nelson or Snoop Dogg.

    I'd also like to reiterate another thing oftenreading said. Only you can determine if you want to try it or not. I'm just trying to give you some helpful info. If a fellow pot smoker ever tries to impose their will or pressure you into it, that's not a person you want to be around. Most pot smokers have a code of honor about this, but there's always a few bad apples.

    Thank you for your post.
    Yeah I know all too well about correlation and causality having studied statistics in psychology last year haha!
    Yeah a fellow student explained the 2 strains to me.
    I am in Australia, not sure how it is sold on the street here. Like how would you know which is which strain if not purchased commercially?
    I'd want one for spiritual purposes, like to be calm and present and amazed by the nature of beauty.
    Plus for my songwriting. A bit of both strains.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 7,764
    Eyeballing a strain to tell what kind it is can be a bit difficult.

    Typically, indica buds are short & densely packed, have a strong aroma, and can feature (but not always) purple coloring. Sativa buds tend to be longer, looser, less pungent, and can feature red or orange coloring.

    The plants they come from are also similar to the buds they grow. Sativa plants are taller, the leaflets on the leaves are skinnier and spread out more. Indica plants are shorter, stockier, and the leaflets are wider & closer together.

    These are just guidelines, and there are always grey areas. There are many, many hybrid strains out there these days that can exhibit the physical characteristics of either/or.

    Best is to just familiarize yourself with the names of strains and what type they are. Leafly.com is a really good resource. They have a mobile app as well.
  • dignindignin Posts: 4,525

    Thoughts_Arrive... Just wanted to mention that I did not smoke pot until my 31st birthday. I'm not sure what difference that makes, but you mentioned you were 32 so I figured I'd throw it out there.

    There are two main strains of marijuana - sativa and indica.

    If you are curious about trying it but are also worried about long term effects and mental illness, I would recommend sativa. Sativas give a more energetic, stimulating high. They can help with focus, awareness, energy, give uplifting thoughts, and promote creativity. Sativas are actually given to medical marijuana patients to help with depression, ADHD, and other mental disorders. They are often given to cancer patients as they help reduce fatigue. Sativas are given to those with eating disorders as they promote hunger. It's the "get shit done" strain. Sour diesel, blue dream, Jack Herer, and almost anything named "haze" are all sativa strains. Most have a woodsy, piney aroma & taste.

    Conversely, indicas are the couch-lock strain. That is what you want when you get home from work and just want to relax and take a load off. Almost anything named "kush" will be an indica strain. Northern lights, white rhino, Skywalker are also examples. Indicas are more fruity in nature. They are typically prescribed to medical patients to help with insomnia, pain relief, muscle relaxation, and nausea. They are the strain you read about as usually suggested to having a link with developing mental disorders. (Again, correlation does not equate causality. But if you're concerned about the link, indica is the one you're leery of.)

    That's not to say if you smoke some Berry Kush that you'll develop a mental disorder. As oftenreading said, most cases are linked to prolonged, heavy usage. Most casual and even daily smokers will never have any issues. Like Willie Nelson or Snoop Dogg.

    I'd also like to reiterate another thing oftenreading said. Only you can determine if you want to try it or not. I'm just trying to give you some helpful info. If a fellow pot smoker ever tries to impose their will or pressure you into it, that's not a person you want to be around. Most pot smokers have a code of honor about this, but there's always a few bad apples.

    Great advice.

    Also funny that I smoked pot for the first time on my 30th birthday, promised some friends.

    I prefer edibles myself, I can control my dosage much easier that way....since I have no idea how to inhale.
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 2,253
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • wndowpaynewndowpayne Posts: 751
    I get angry when I see new breweries opening here..and there are a bunch...but God forbid I go home and puff while peeps can drink their livers away..
    Charlottesville 2013
    Hampton 2016

  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 12,019

    I get angry when I see new breweries opening here..and there are a bunch...but God forbid I go home and puff while peeps can drink their livers away..

    Amen!
  • helplessdancerhelplessdancer Posts: 3,690
    "legalized cannabis will take money away from gangs"
    it amazes me how long it takes to figure some things out...the prohibition of alcohol didn't work either. the gangs made buckets of cash!
    https://ca.news.yahoo.com/trudeau-runs-five-kilometre-course-190139833.html
  • SomethingCreativeSomethingCreative Posts: 2,694
    jeffbr said:

    I've never tried marijuana but have always been curious of how it would feel to be high.
    The reason I have not tried it is because there is evidence that it leads to schizophrenia and bad psychosis.
    For all you smokers on here, do you not feel worried that you may develop schizophrenia?
    My brother in laws brother is now severely schizophrenic due to smoking marijuana.
    Plus, I am a university student, don't need marijuana making me unmotivated and affecting my memory and concentration.

    I'm not aware of any studies showing a causal relationship between marijuana and schizophrenia. Do you have a source? I know that there may be an increased risk if a person has other genetic risk factors for the psychosis. But at this point smoking marijuana has never been shown to cause schizophrenia as far as I know.
    Maybe pulled from this fine documentary?


    "Well, I think this band is incapable of sucking."
    -my dad after hearing Not for You for the first time on SNL .

    I need a BASS PLAYER! demos here:

    http://www.soundcloud.com/stiwi_c
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,238
    Interesting, though lengthy, article from the Globe and Mail, regarding testing of samples from a variety of dispensaries around Toronto. Dispensaries are illegal but generally tolerated, as we wait for the federal government to introduce legislation around legalization.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/investigations/globe-investigation-whats-in-your-weed-we-tested-dispensary-marijuana-to-findout/article31144496/
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • joseph33joseph33 NashvillePosts: 733
    Not everyone knows how to make beer and hard liquor. But in fact everyone does know how to plant seeds. It's how to regulate that is the problem for most states.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 34,813

    Interesting, though lengthy, article from the Globe and Mail, regarding testing of samples from a variety of dispensaries around Toronto. Dispensaries are illegal but generally tolerated, as we wait for the federal government to introduce legislation around legalization.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/investigations/globe-investigation-whats-in-your-weed-we-tested-dispensary-marijuana-to-findout/article31144496/

    I've been told by some people from places other than Vancouver and Toronto that dispensaries aren't really tolerated and for the most part don't exist outside of those two cities. But where they do exist, I dunno... I've never heard of a story where some place was selling weed that made people sick or anything like that. But at any rate, regulating the manufacturing will be a good thing.... as long as they don't allow a monopoly to form. And I'm not confident that they won't. I can't wait to see this legislation. I hope it's not TOO disappointing. I'm really worried that it's going to aim to bully current players out of the industry.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
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