Police abuse

1838486888996

Comments

  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    dignin said:

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens And Cronies Breathe Sigh Of Relief While Deputies Take The Fifth

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens claims the veteran officers were unaware they were required to testify honestly during prior court appearances for the death penalty case marred by astonishing degrees of government cheating.



    http://www.ocweekly.com/news/orange-county-sheriffs-deputies-refuse-to-testify-under-oath-in-jailhouse-snitch-scandal-8139758
    Now there's some dishonest and unfit officers of law. Fire them all. Willfully and purposely lying deserves no leniency.

    On a side note, that article would have been easier to read without the excessive beach wear ads surrounding the page. Talk about poor choice to go along with that story.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • dignindignin Posts: 5,195
    edited May 30
    tbergs said:
    dignin said:

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens And Cronies Breathe Sigh Of Relief While Deputies Take The Fifth

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens claims the veteran officers were unaware they were required to testify honestly during prior court appearances for the death penalty case marred by astonishing degrees of government cheating.



    http://www.ocweekly.com/news/orange-county-sheriffs-deputies-refuse-to-testify-under-oath-in-jailhouse-snitch-scandal-8139758
    Now there's some dishonest and unfit officers of law. Fire them all. Willfully and purposely lying deserves no leniency.

    On a side note, that article would have been easier to read without the excessive beach wear ads surrounding the page. Talk about poor choice to go along with that story.
    Sorry about that. I have adblock so I didn't see those ads. Adblock is a must.

    Edit: Also, those are targeted ads, so the internet must think you are in need of some good beach wear.
    Post edited by dignin on
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    dignin said:
    tbergs said:
    dignin said:

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens And Cronies Breathe Sigh Of Relief While Deputies Take The Fifth

    Sheriff Sandra Hutchens claims the veteran officers were unaware they were required to testify honestly during prior court appearances for the death penalty case marred by astonishing degrees of government cheating.



    http://www.ocweekly.com/news/orange-county-sheriffs-deputies-refuse-to-testify-under-oath-in-jailhouse-snitch-scandal-8139758
    Now there's some dishonest and unfit officers of law. Fire them all. Willfully and purposely lying deserves no leniency.

    On a side note, that article would have been easier to read without the excessive beach wear ads surrounding the page. Talk about poor choice to go along with that story.
    Sorry about that. I have adblock so I didn't see those ads. Adblock is a must.

    Edit: Also, those are targeted ads, so the internet must think you are in need of some good beach wear.
    Haha! I went back to see what specifically was being promoted and it was an ad to win tickets to Summer Fest out in the OC. Apparently I want to go to that :)
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,237
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    mace1229 said:
    I just refreshed my memory of Tamir. I won't argue it was a tragedy, and incredibly sad.
    Unfortunately, there are parts i this country where 12 and 13 year olds are in gangs and have a gun. SO what do you want the police to do? Wait until someone gets shot?
    It is a sad story, but I place zero fault on the police in that situation. It was a toy gu where the orange tip had been removed, he had been pointing it at people, reached for it in his waistband when police arrived. Seriously, what do they need to do, wait until shots are fired before they intervene?  I certainly don't expect that.
    I have seen bad examples of police work, I dont argue that they don't exist. I argue that it seems like far too many police shootings now are claimed to be "abuse" when they are not.  I wouldn't give those cops a medal for great police work, but I can't fault them for what happened either, given the information available to them and the circumstances. It was a tragedy, and I'mm sure those cops think about it every day.

    The standard for shooting is "posed an immediate threat" and not "had a weapon" as you suggested. Someone reaching for a gun in their waistband is an IMMEDIATE threat.

    Under your system you also have 2 dead cops.

    So if reaching for a gun isn't an immediate threat, what is? When he points it at you? When he fires the first round? When the first person get shot? WHat someone actually dies? When, in your opinion, is an armed person an immediate threat? 

    That is not a correct summary of the Tamir Rice case as supported by evidence.  You have accepted the official police version which has elements omitted and details which are not corroborated by the evidence available.

    The video is inconclusive as to whether he was reaching for the weapon, and the only thing that is truly definitive is that the officer assumed the citizen to be an immediate threat prior to actually assessing him.
    If we're going to talk about Rice, then lets make sure to point out how badly the dispatcher messed up. A costly mistake for sure and I'm sure they feel horrible about it. Mistakes happen isn't acceptable in the LE world, but they are going to happen because people make mistakes, so what is the solution? Rice is not an abuse of power situation either. It would be really nice if we were like Australia and guns were not an option, but until then, incidents like this will continue to happen.
    The solution is to hold people responsible for their mistakes.  Duh.
    The solution is to screen, train, and compensate people better so that they make fewer mistakes.  

    Should the officer and dispatching be in jail?  Probably not, but they sure as shit shouldn't be in the field any more!
    I guess I'll entertain you one more time, but I don't know why I bother. You seem to always be on a higher ground in every conversation on these boards.

    To your first response, obviously. Who isn't being held responsible? Just because someone isn't fired doesn't mean they aren't held responsible.

    To your second point, again, obviously, but what does that even mean. These position are screened and rigorously trained. Standards have increased nationwide in the last 30 years, but I agree that some states still lag behind in the requirements. Nobody under 21 should be allowed to be a cop. In MN there are strict requirements to even be eligible for a license and before hiring the agency will still make you go through an initial written test, several interviews, a physical, physical skills test, psychological exams (both in person and written) and then once hired, you will go through all that department's training (policies, defensive tactics, use of force, defensive driving, etc.) and then work with multiple Field Training Officers for the first several months, during which time you will be graded daily on your performance and in most cases go before a review board monthly before you are cleared to be on your own, all while still being on a year of probation and required to obtain at least 40 CE's every 3 years and go through firearms training multiple times a year. Maybe there are still Mayberry style departments out there and if so, that needs to change, but if you were to look at the training file on any of the officers involved in a shooting, it's not like it's being neglected or lacking.

    As for your last point, should they be out of the field? That depends on the circumstances and outcome of the investigation in to the incident. If based on all the evidence the shooting is ruled unjustified, then yes. As for the dispatcher, maybe. You'll have a hard time firing anyone in a union if there are no other disciplinary records.

    The problem is that we want perfect people to do these jobs, but anyone who seems perfect is only one decision away from that mistake that could alter someone's life forever.
    Well the cop who shot Tamir Rice was just fired because he falsified his application and was not rigorously screened.
    I'm not sure if you know this, but the average length of police academy training is 19 weeks.  Less than 5 months.
    It takes a minimum of 8months to become a cosmetologist.
    2 years to be a nursing assistant.
    6 months to 2 years to be an EMT.

    I don't want perfection, I don't get that from a surgeon who trains for 10 to 12 years.
    I just want standards and compensation that reflect the gravity of the job.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,237
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    mace1229 said:
    I just refreshed my memory of Tamir. I won't argue it was a tragedy, and incredibly sad.
    Unfortunately, there are parts i this country where 12 and 13 year olds are in gangs and have a gun. SO what do you want the police to do? Wait until someone gets shot?
    It is a sad story, but I place zero fault on the police in that situation. It was a toy gu where the orange tip had been removed, he had been pointing it at people, reached for it in his waistband when police arrived. Seriously, what do they need to do, wait until shots are fired before they intervene?  I certainly don't expect that.
    I have seen bad examples of police work, I dont argue that they don't exist. I argue that it seems like far too many police shootings now are claimed to be "abuse" when they are not.  I wouldn't give those cops a medal for great police work, but I can't fault them for what happened either, given the information available to them and the circumstances. It was a tragedy, and I'mm sure those cops think about it every day.

    The standard for shooting is "posed an immediate threat" and not "had a weapon" as you suggested. Someone reaching for a gun in their waistband is an IMMEDIATE threat.

    Under your system you also have 2 dead cops.

    So if reaching for a gun isn't an immediate threat, what is? When he points it at you? When he fires the first round? When the first person get shot? WHat someone actually dies? When, in your opinion, is an armed person an immediate threat? 

    That is not a correct summary of the Tamir Rice case as supported by evidence.  You have accepted the official police version which has elements omitted and details which are not corroborated by the evidence available.

    The video is inconclusive as to whether he was reaching for the weapon, and the only thing that is truly definitive is that the officer assumed the citizen to be an immediate threat prior to actually assessing him.
    If we're going to talk about Rice, then lets make sure to point out how badly the dispatcher messed up. A costly mistake for sure and I'm sure they feel horrible about it. Mistakes happen isn't acceptable in the LE world, but they are going to happen because people make mistakes, so what is the solution? Rice is not an abuse of power situation either. It would be really nice if we were like Australia and guns were not an option, but until then, incidents like this will continue to happen.
    The solution is to hold people responsible for their mistakes.  Duh.
    The solution is to screen, train, and compensate people better so that they make fewer mistakes.  

    Should the officer and dispatching be in jail?  Probably not, but they sure as shit shouldn't be in the field any more!
    I guess I'll entertain you one more time, but I don't know why I bother. You seem to always be on a higher ground in every conversation on these boards.

    To your first response, obviously. Who isn't being held responsible? Just because someone isn't fired doesn't mean they aren't held responsible.

    To your second point, again, obviously, but what does that even mean. These position are screened and rigorously trained. Standards have increased nationwide in the last 30 years, but I agree that some states still lag behind in the requirements. Nobody under 21 should be allowed to be a cop. In MN there are strict requirements to even be eligible for a license and before hiring the agency will still make you go through an initial written test, several interviews, a physical, physical skills test, psychological exams (both in person and written) and then once hired, you will go through all that department's training (policies, defensive tactics, use of force, defensive driving, etc.) and then work with multiple Field Training Officers for the first several months, during which time you will be graded daily on your performance and in most cases go before a review board monthly before you are cleared to be on your own, all while still being on a year of probation and required to obtain at least 40 CE's every 3 years and go through firearms training multiple times a year. Maybe there are still Mayberry style departments out there and if so, that needs to change, but if you were to look at the training file on any of the officers involved in a shooting, it's not like it's being neglected or lacking.

    As for your last point, should they be out of the field? That depends on the circumstances and outcome of the investigation in to the incident. If based on all the evidence the shooting is ruled unjustified, then yes. As for the dispatcher, maybe. You'll have a hard time firing anyone in a union if there are no other disciplinary records.

    The problem is that we want perfect people to do these jobs, but anyone who seems perfect is only one decision away from that mistake that could alter someone's life forever.



    I would accept that if there was an independent body to make that determination, and not the guy who hired you that you golf with on the weekends.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    mace1229 said:
    I just refreshed my memory of Tamir. I won't argue it was a tragedy, and incredibly sad.
    Unfortunately, there are parts i this country where 12 and 13 year olds are in gangs and have a gun. SO what do you want the police to do? Wait until someone gets shot?
    It is a sad story, but I place zero fault on the police in that situation. It was a toy gu where the orange tip had been removed, he had been pointing it at people, reached for it in his waistband when police arrived. Seriously, what do they need to do, wait until shots are fired before they intervene?  I certainly don't expect that.
    I have seen bad examples of police work, I dont argue that they don't exist. I argue that it seems like far too many police shootings now are claimed to be "abuse" when they are not.  I wouldn't give those cops a medal for great police work, but I can't fault them for what happened either, given the information available to them and the circumstances. It was a tragedy, and I'mm sure those cops think about it every day.

    The standard for shooting is "posed an immediate threat" and not "had a weapon" as you suggested. Someone reaching for a gun in their waistband is an IMMEDIATE threat.

    Under your system you also have 2 dead cops.

    So if reaching for a gun isn't an immediate threat, what is? When he points it at you? When he fires the first round? When the first person get shot? WHat someone actually dies? When, in your opinion, is an armed person an immediate threat? 

    That is not a correct summary of the Tamir Rice case as supported by evidence.  You have accepted the official police version which has elements omitted and details which are not corroborated by the evidence available.

    The video is inconclusive as to whether he was reaching for the weapon, and the only thing that is truly definitive is that the officer assumed the citizen to be an immediate threat prior to actually assessing him.
    If we're going to talk about Rice, then lets make sure to point out how badly the dispatcher messed up. A costly mistake for sure and I'm sure they feel horrible about it. Mistakes happen isn't acceptable in the LE world, but they are going to happen because people make mistakes, so what is the solution? Rice is not an abuse of power situation either. It would be really nice if we were like Australia and guns were not an option, but until then, incidents like this will continue to happen.
    The solution is to hold people responsible for their mistakes.  Duh.
    The solution is to screen, train, and compensate people better so that they make fewer mistakes.  

    Should the officer and dispatching be in jail?  Probably not, but they sure as shit shouldn't be in the field any more!
    I guess I'll entertain you one more time, but I don't know why I bother. You seem to always be on a higher ground in every conversation on these boards.

    To your first response, obviously. Who isn't being held responsible? Just because someone isn't fired doesn't mean they aren't held responsible.

    To your second point, again, obviously, but what does that even mean. These position are screened and rigorously trained. Standards have increased nationwide in the last 30 years, but I agree that some states still lag behind in the requirements. Nobody under 21 should be allowed to be a cop. In MN there are strict requirements to even be eligible for a license and before hiring the agency will still make you go through an initial written test, several interviews, a physical, physical skills test, psychological exams (both in person and written) and then once hired, you will go through all that department's training (policies, defensive tactics, use of force, defensive driving, etc.) and then work with multiple Field Training Officers for the first several months, during which time you will be graded daily on your performance and in most cases go before a review board monthly before you are cleared to be on your own, all while still being on a year of probation and required to obtain at least 40 CE's every 3 years and go through firearms training multiple times a year. Maybe there are still Mayberry style departments out there and if so, that needs to change, but if you were to look at the training file on any of the officers involved in a shooting, it's not like it's being neglected or lacking.

    As for your last point, should they be out of the field? That depends on the circumstances and outcome of the investigation in to the incident. If based on all the evidence the shooting is ruled unjustified, then yes. As for the dispatcher, maybe. You'll have a hard time firing anyone in a union if there are no other disciplinary records.

    The problem is that we want perfect people to do these jobs, but anyone who seems perfect is only one decision away from that mistake that could alter someone's life forever.
    Well the cop who shot Tamir Rice was just fired because he falsified his application and was not rigorously screened.
    I'm not sure if you know this, but the average length of police academy training is 19 weeks.  Less than 5 months.
    It takes a minimum of 8months to become a cosmetologist.
    2 years to be a nursing assistant.
    6 months to 2 years to be an EMT.

    I don't want perfection, I don't get that from a surgeon who trains for 10 to 12 years.
    I just want standards and compensation that reflect the gravity of the job.
    I saw the Rice finding. That falsified information was the job of the background investigator and that should be followed up on. I'd like to here how that was missed.

    I'm all for more training and higher age restrictions on hiring officers. No one under 25 and a 4 year degree in a social justice/human services/psychology related field would be ideal. 
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,237
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    tbergs said:
    rgambs said:
    mace1229 said:
    I just refreshed my memory of Tamir. I won't argue it was a tragedy, and incredibly sad.
    Unfortunately, there are parts i this country where 12 and 13 year olds are in gangs and have a gun. SO what do you want the police to do? Wait until someone gets shot?
    It is a sad story, but I place zero fault on the police in that situation. It was a toy gu where the orange tip had been removed, he had been pointing it at people, reached for it in his waistband when police arrived. Seriously, what do they need to do, wait until shots are fired before they intervene?  I certainly don't expect that.
    I have seen bad examples of police work, I dont argue that they don't exist. I argue that it seems like far too many police shootings now are claimed to be "abuse" when they are not.  I wouldn't give those cops a medal for great police work, but I can't fault them for what happened either, given the information available to them and the circumstances. It was a tragedy, and I'mm sure those cops think about it every day.

    The standard for shooting is "posed an immediate threat" and not "had a weapon" as you suggested. Someone reaching for a gun in their waistband is an IMMEDIATE threat.

    Under your system you also have 2 dead cops.

    So if reaching for a gun isn't an immediate threat, what is? When he points it at you? When he fires the first round? When the first person get shot? WHat someone actually dies? When, in your opinion, is an armed person an immediate threat? 

    That is not a correct summary of the Tamir Rice case as supported by evidence.  You have accepted the official police version which has elements omitted and details which are not corroborated by the evidence available.

    The video is inconclusive as to whether he was reaching for the weapon, and the only thing that is truly definitive is that the officer assumed the citizen to be an immediate threat prior to actually assessing him.
    If we're going to talk about Rice, then lets make sure to point out how badly the dispatcher messed up. A costly mistake for sure and I'm sure they feel horrible about it. Mistakes happen isn't acceptable in the LE world, but they are going to happen because people make mistakes, so what is the solution? Rice is not an abuse of power situation either. It would be really nice if we were like Australia and guns were not an option, but until then, incidents like this will continue to happen.
    The solution is to hold people responsible for their mistakes.  Duh.
    The solution is to screen, train, and compensate people better so that they make fewer mistakes.  

    Should the officer and dispatching be in jail?  Probably not, but they sure as shit shouldn't be in the field any more!
    I guess I'll entertain you one more time, but I don't know why I bother. You seem to always be on a higher ground in every conversation on these boards.

    To your first response, obviously. Who isn't being held responsible? Just because someone isn't fired doesn't mean they aren't held responsible.

    To your second point, again, obviously, but what does that even mean. These position are screened and rigorously trained. Standards have increased nationwide in the last 30 years, but I agree that some states still lag behind in the requirements. Nobody under 21 should be allowed to be a cop. In MN there are strict requirements to even be eligible for a license and before hiring the agency will still make you go through an initial written test, several interviews, a physical, physical skills test, psychological exams (both in person and written) and then once hired, you will go through all that department's training (policies, defensive tactics, use of force, defensive driving, etc.) and then work with multiple Field Training Officers for the first several months, during which time you will be graded daily on your performance and in most cases go before a review board monthly before you are cleared to be on your own, all while still being on a year of probation and required to obtain at least 40 CE's every 3 years and go through firearms training multiple times a year. Maybe there are still Mayberry style departments out there and if so, that needs to change, but if you were to look at the training file on any of the officers involved in a shooting, it's not like it's being neglected or lacking.

    As for your last point, should they be out of the field? That depends on the circumstances and outcome of the investigation in to the incident. If based on all the evidence the shooting is ruled unjustified, then yes. As for the dispatcher, maybe. You'll have a hard time firing anyone in a union if there are no other disciplinary records.

    The problem is that we want perfect people to do these jobs, but anyone who seems perfect is only one decision away from that mistake that could alter someone's life forever.
    Well the cop who shot Tamir Rice was just fired because he falsified his application and was not rigorously screened.
    I'm not sure if you know this, but the average length of police academy training is 19 weeks.  Less than 5 months.
    It takes a minimum of 8months to become a cosmetologist.
    2 years to be a nursing assistant.
    6 months to 2 years to be an EMT.

    I don't want perfection, I don't get that from a surgeon who trains for 10 to 12 years.
    I just want standards and compensation that reflect the gravity of the job.
    I saw the Rice finding. That falsified information was the job of the background investigator and that should be followed up on. I'd like to here how that was missed.

    I'm all for more training and higher age restrictions on hiring officers. No one under 25 and a 4 year degree in a social justice/human services/psychology related field would be ideal. 
    And at least double the average salary they currently make.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 9,237
    In case you miss it in the other thread, @Thirty Bills Unpaid

    "In one such incident, captured in a body camera video, an officer confronts a knife-wielding suspect following a traffic stop. As the man advances, the officer backs up, using his cruiser as cover ― “giving ground” in police terminology. This gives the cop time to regroup and draw his Taser. He then stuns the suspect and disarms him, before pulling out the handcuffs."

    Golly, that sure does sound familiar.  You'd better start mocking the Salt Lake PD relentlessly.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    Verdict coming in Philando Castile shooting by Officer Yanez in minutes. 
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    tbergs said:
    Verdict coming in Philando Castile shooting by Officer Yanez in minutes. 
    Not guilty on all counts.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • OnWis97OnWis97 St. Paul, MNPosts: 469
    tbergs said:
    tbergs said:
    Verdict coming in Philando Castile shooting by Officer Yanez in minutes. 
    Not guilty on all counts.
    That was a no-brainer.  

    For all intents and purposes, it's legal for cops to murder black males in this country.
    1995 Milwaukee
    1998 Alpine, Alpine
    2003 Albany, Boston, Boston, Boston
    2004 Boston, Boston
    2006 Hartford, St. Paul (Petty), St. Paul (Petty)
    2011 Alpine, Alpine
    2013 Wrigley
    2014 St. Paul
    2016 Fenway, Fenway, Wrigley, Wrigley
  • AndySlashAndySlash Posts: 3,023
    if there was one case where i thought there might be actual penalties for the officer, it was this one. i'll never be convinced that yanez was justified in any way. this is a shame and a travesty. yet it's still not surprising. shit is fucked, yo.
    the plural of vinyl is vinyl
  • unsungunsung Posts: 7,736
    Disappointing.
  • dudemandudeman Posts: 1,416
    What a mess. 
    If hope can grow from dirt like me, it can be done. - EV
  • gimmesometruth27gimmesometruth27 St. Fuckin LouisPosts: 15,915
    tbergs said:
    tbergs said:
    Verdict coming in Philando Castile shooting by Officer Yanez in minutes. 
    Not guilty on all counts.
    i am not surprised at all.
    "There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."- Hemingway

    "i'm not here to start the fire. i am here to fan the flames..."

    If you have never failed, you have never lived.
  • dignindignin Posts: 5,195
    Ugh.
  • unsungunsung Posts: 7,736
    Where is leaveittobeavers?  I said something about a black man losing his life and his gun rights.  It is known.
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    edited June 20
    Castile shooting video released:
    See below.
    Post edited by tbergs on
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 2,963
    embedded now

    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 2,963
    how that cop wasn't prosecuted for murder is beyond me

    watch the cop on the right reaction,  at no point does he appear to be threatened until the other cop starts shooting.  He almost certainly had a better line of sight into the passenger side of the vehicle
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • CM189191 said:
    how that cop wasn't prosecuted for murder is beyond me

    watch the cop on the right reaction,  at no point does he appear to be threatened until the other cop starts shooting.  He almost certainly had a better line of sight into the passenger side of the vehicle
    My take is he felt most threatened by the officer. He bristles at the gun fire, is extremely nervous at the vehicle once the shots have been fired, and then finally takes the kid into his arms.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • I usually side with police when it comes to dog encounters, but this one isn't good:


    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 2,963
    I usually side with police when it comes to dog encounters, but this one isn't good:


    Both dogs, aged five-years-old, are service dogs for LeMay's children. Rocko helps LeMay's oldest child with a seizure disorder while Ciroc assists the younger child who has anxiety and mental health issues.
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/07/10/minneapolis-police-officer-shoots-two-dogs-in-backyard-video-shows.html
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • unsungunsung Posts: 7,736
    edited July 12
    Coward.
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    Must be afraid of dogs and probably stereotyping they were aggressive based on their breed, which is why he shot without them really ever approaching him.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 2,963
    tbergs said:
    Must be afraid of dogs and probably stereotyping they were aggressive based on their breed, which is why he shot without them really ever approaching him.
    well that certainly doesn't sound like something a cop would do
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • unsungunsung Posts: 7,736
    edited July 13
    Here is a cop throwing a shoulder into a 17 year old and the crooked media applying their title.


  • tbergstbergs Posts: 2,789
    unsung said:
    Here is a cop throwing a shoulder into a 17 year old and the crooked media applying their title.


    Hard to tell if it was intentional or not, but here's the whole story from the "crooked media".

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.sfgate.com/bayarea/amp/Videos-emerge-of-SF-police-officer-bumping-11283292.php
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • unsungunsung Posts: 7,736
    Those poor police.  I can't imagine their stress from having to deal with those skater punks.
Sign In or Register to comment.